Pickling Vegetables

USDA – Preparing and Canning Fermented Foods and Pickled Vegetables
Nearing the end of the gardening season you find that you have a great number of vegetables that need to be harvested and preserved for winters dinner table. Of course you may decide to freeze or can much of your garden surplus but pickling vegetables is also a good choice and so easy to do.

Everyone knows about pickled cucumbers, but what about pickled asparagus, broccoli, okra, peppers, radishes, or zucchini? Or maybe fermenting and canning a few jars of cabbage(sauerkraut). Almost all vegetables and many fruits can be pickled using the same basic recipe and procedure.

Hint Pickling salt is highly recommended and can be found in most supermarkets. However fermented and non-fermented pickles may be safely made using either iodized or non-iodized table salt. Be aware that the non-caking materials added to table salts may make the brine cloudy. Flake salt varies in density and is not recommended for use in canning or fermenting vegetables.

PICKLED ASPARAGUS
10 lbs asparagus
6 large garlic cloves
4-1/2 cups water
4-1/2 cups white distilled vinegar (5%)
6 small hot peppers (optional)
1/2 cup canning salt
3 tsp dill seed
Wash asparagus well, but gently, under running water. Cut stems from the bottom to leave spears with tips that fit into the canning jar, leaving a little more than 1/2-inch headspace. Peel and wash garlic cloves. Place a garlic clove at the bottom of each jar, and tightly pack asparagus into hot jars with the blunt ends down. In an 8 quart saucepan, combine water, vinegar, hot peppers (optional), salt and dill seed. Bring to a boil. Place one hot pepper (if used) in each jar over asparagus spears. Pour boiling hot pickling brine over spears, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed.
Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process in a boiling water bath for 10 to 15 minutes.

PICKLED DILL BEANS
4 lbs fresh tender green or yellow beans (5 to 6 inches long)
8 to 16 heads fresh dill
8 cloves garlic (optional)
1/2 cup canning or pickling salt
4 cups white vinegar (5%)
4 cups water
1 tsp hot red pepper flakes (optional)
8 pints
Wash and trim ends from beans and cut to 4-inch lengths. In each hot sterile pint jar, place 1 to 2 dill heads and, if desired, 1 clove of garlic. Place whole beans upright in jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Trim beans to ensure proper fit, if necessary.
Combine salt, vinegar, water, and pepper flakes (if desired). Bring to a boil. Add hot solution to beans, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed.
Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process.

PICKLED BEETS
7 lbs of 2- to 2-1/2-inch diameter beets
4 cups vinegar (5%)
1-1/2 tsp canning or pickling salt
2 cups sugar
2 cups water
2 cinnamon sticks
12 whole cloves
4 to 6 onions (2- to 2-1/2-inch diameter), if desired
8 pints
Trim off beet tops, leaving 1 inch of stem and roots to prevent bleeding of color.
Wash thoroughly. Sort for size. Cover similar sizes together with boiling water and cook until tender (about 25 to 30 minutes).
Caution Drain and discard liquid.
Cool beets. Trim off roots and stems and slip off skins. Slice into 1/4-inch slices. Peel and thinly slice onions. Combine vinegar, salt, sugar, and fresh water. Put spices in cheesecloth bag and add to vinegar mixture. Bring to a boil. Add beets and onions. Simmer 5 minutes. Remove spice bag. Fill hot jars with beets and onions, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Add hot vinegar solution, allowing 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process in boiling water bath 10-15 minutes.
Variation:
For pickled whole baby beets, follow above directions but use beets that are 1-to
1-1/2 inches in diameter. Pack whole; do not slice. Onions may be omitted.

PICKLED CARROTS
2-3/4 lbs peeled carrots (about 3-1/2 lbs as purchased)
5-1/2 cups white vinegar (5%)
1 cup water
2 cups sugar
2 tsp canning salt
8 tsp mustard seed
4 tsp celery seed
4 pints jars
Wash and peel carrots. Cut into rounds that are approximately 1/2 inch thick.
Combine vinegar, water, sugar and canning salt in an 8-quart Dutch oven or stockpot. Bring to a boil and boil 3 minutes. Add carrots and bring back to a boil. Then reduce heat to a simmer and heat until half-cooked (about 10 minutes). Meanwhile, place 2 teaspoons mustard seed and 1 teaspoon celery seed into each empty hot pint jar. Fill jars with hot carrots, leaving 1-inch headspace. Fill with hot pickling liquid, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process in boiling water bath 10-15 minutes.

PICKLED CAULIFLOWER OR BRUSSELS SPROUTS
12 cups of 1- to 2-inch cauliflower flowerets or small Brussels sprouts
4 cups white vinegar (5%)
2 cups sugar
2 cups thinly sliced onions
1 cup diced sweet red peppers
2 tbsp mustard seed
1 tbsp celery seed
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp hot red pepper flakes
9 half-pint jars
Wash cauliflower flowerets or Brussels sprouts (remove stems and blemished outer leaves) and boil in salt water (4 tsp canning salt per gallon of water) for 3 minutes for cauliflower and 4 minutes for Brussels sprouts. Drain and cool. Combine vinegar, sugar, onion, diced red pepper, and spices in large saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer 5 minutes.
Distribute onion and diced pepper among jars. Fill hot jars with pieces and pickling solution, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process in boiling water bath 10-15 minutes.

Hints on spices Feel free to experiment. Add spices you like. Things like red pepper flakes, celery seed, dill seed and so on. Use as much or as little as you like to each jar before packing and pouring hot vinegar to fill your canning/pickling jar.

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14 responses to “Pickling Vegetables

  1. Dilly Beans are on my agenda this week!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Grand mother put up pickled beans, I never have except I sometimes do quick pickling for today’s salad. Let us know how they turn out.
      Happy gardening

      Like

  2. I finally came up with the perfect pickle recipe…for me….since I can’t have too much salt and I don’t want too much sugar……but now that I have, I am eating them too fast……and find that I must grow some more cucumbers as soon as it cools off a bit………one thing leads to another….:)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Cucumbers and tomato’s are top choice vegetables.
      I tend to allow my cucumbers to remain on the vine a day or two longer than I should.
      happy gardening

      Like

  3. I remember about 30 years ago, wondering if I would regret throwing out my encyclopedia set. I’ve never missed it, of course.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I also sold my encyclopedia set many years ago and have not regretted that decision.
      In print reference books are pretty much worthless now days. Technology and information are changing and being updated so fast and so often that print books are out of date before you open their cover.

      Happy gardening

      Liked by 1 person

  4. When I was a kid, our neighbor, Mr. Smitton, ran the 4 Corners, and he always had a big jar of pickled vegetables on the counter. We lived just down the road, went in for Gramma’s paper, milk, etc – he called us “mosquitoes” cause we were always on him in a pack. My gramma told him we were not allowed to eat too much candy, but he let us have all the pickles we wanted – no charge! There was a big jar of pigs’ feet and another jar of eggs – he offered us “two bits” if we would eat one of those, but we never went for it. Although, you could get a candy bar for about “two bits” in those days, it was a temptation.

    I’ll have to try to pickle some carrots, see what I get – I’ll keep you posted!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. This is a good reference. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Grin … my presidential campaign pledge: a pickle on every plate

    Happy gardening

    Like

  7. I like your recipes- my brain is just now starting to come back after…well, perhaps Too Many Pickles last year. They’re STILL everywhere you look. But new recipes! LIFE IS GOOD!!

    Like

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