Category Archives: Family

Rose Garden – 3 of 3

Container Gardening
Container rose plantings are not only a decorative addition to any part of the outdoor living area, they are also a perfect way to change the look of the landscape from month to month or year to year. Roses in pots extend the scope and possibilities of gardening. Wide walkways can be highlighted with tubs of roses spotted here and there. Steps to the front or back door can be graced with the beauty and fragrance of roses. Miniature roses can dress up window boxes in the summer, and then be brought indoors in winter to perk up the house.

Patios, decks, and terraces have become favorite spots for entertaining and relaxing on warm summer days and evenings. Add to the pleasure of these moments with planters teeming with the color and fragrance of the world’s favorite flower. In an area used at night, select a white or pastel rose, such as Cherish, French Lace, or Rose Parade. Bring color right down to the swimming pool with pots of roses set on the paving. If you have a spot to hang a basket, fill it with miniature roses for a continuous display of summer color, then move the basket indoors for the winter. Select a trailing variety and let the flowers cascade from tree limbs, overhangs, and brackets.

Gardening without a garden: Containers make it possible to grow roses on balconies, terraces, and roof tops high above city streets. The limited gardening space that comes with condos, town houses, and brownstones can be multiplied with portable planters. Movable roses should be the shorter-growing varieties of the modern-day hybrid roses as they are more compact with great quantities of flowers all summer.

Good selections are:
* New Year * Showbiz * Impatient * Intrigue * Sun Flare * Mon Cheri * Marina * Charisma * First Edition * Cathedral * Bahia * Electron * Redgold * Gene Boerner * Angel Face * Europeana * Garden Party * Sarabande * Ivory Fashion

Containers can be any shape, round, or hexagonal as long as they are 18 inches across and 14 inches deep for proper root development. Use pots made of plastic, clay, terra cotta, ceramic, metal, or wood. All they need to be effective is drainage at the bottom. If you’re working with a planter that does not have drainage holes, add a thick layer of gravel at the bottom of the container so the roots do not become waterlogged. Pots can be heavy and difficult to move about, so casters are an excellent addition.

Roses need at least six hours of sun a day ideally place movable roses where they receive morning sun and some protection form the midday heat. Also try to keep them out of drying winds. If the plants receive uneven sun and start growing in one direction to reach the light, rotate them often to keep growth straight. Roses in containers will need more water than the same roses in the ground. Not only are all sides of the container subject to drying sun and winds, there is also no ground water to fall back upon. Watch planters carefully and water whenever the growing medium starts to dry out. Water until moisture runs from the bottom of the container. A mulch on top of the planter will help keep the roots of the roses moist and cool.

Planting soil should be rich and well drained. A packaged or homemade mix of half organic matter, such as peat moss or compost, and half perlite or vermiculite is ideal. As roses in pots must be watered so often, they must also be fertilized frequently. Feed each week with soluble fertilizer at one-quarter strength for even growth and flowering.

Winter storage, move the pots into an unheated but frost- free area, keep the soil slightly moist, cover with plastic, and return to the outdoors in spring.

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Soybean Oil May Be Killing You And Your Family

Source Soybean oil, science now shows is worse than sugar

Poonamjot Deol, Ph.D., a cell biologist at the University of California said “Mice who ate the soybean oil diet without fructose gained the most weight, 9 percent more than the fructose eating mice and a whopping 25 percent more than the mice who got their fat from coconut oil. Compared to their fructose eating counterparts, the mice on the soybean oil diet also had fattier livers and more insulin resistance, both signs of impending diabetes and metabolic syndrome.”

We’ve actually tested corn oil, and we found that it was also causing more obesity than coconut oil, but not as much as soybean oil. We haven’t tested canola yet.

Soybean oil is supposed to be healthy. It is everywhere. A full half of all the vegetable oil produced in the world is soybean oil. And since it’s cheap, the stuff is used in endless packaged foods. It’s also a favorite at restaurants.

Deol said “It’s so prevalent in our food system. If something says vegetable oil, it’s most likely soybean oil, or soybean oil is a component.”

Rose Garden – 2 of 3

texas-yellow-rose
Care and feeding: your feeding program, like your spraying, should be done regularly. Roses are heavy feeders. To keep them growing vigorously, a feeding program should be followed. Water rose bed thoroughly before and after food has been applied.

* January thru February — As the weather and ground warm up, around mid to late February, organic fertilizers may be applied. Give each large bush. one to two cups of a mixture of alfalfa meal, cottonseed meal, fish meal and blood meal, scratch in lightly and water in well.

* March thru May — The initial feeding should be chemical, either liquid or dry. It is applied when spring pruning is completed. Miracle-Gro, Peters or Rapid-Gro are all good soluble fertilizers. Give each Hybrid Tea or other large bush, one tablespoon of fertilizer dissolved in a gallon of water.

For miniatures use one teaspoon of liquid food per gallon of water. Give each plant about a quart. Dry rose fertilizer can be applied in place of liquid. Use according to directions. Liquid feeding in this period should be once a month. Mature climbers should be given double the amount given to Hybrid Teas.

* June thru August — With the introduction of timed release fertilizers, a summer long feeding in one application is possible. These fertilizers are formulated to feed continuously for three to six months in our climate. Feed each average sized bush at least three or four ounces, working it lightly into the soil. Water thoroughly. If you don’t care to use this type of product, continue feeding with a water soluble food (twice a month), or a monthly application of dry food. As the weather becomes hot, you may want to switch to soluble fertilizers as they are more readily available to the plants. Iron deficiency may occurs at this time. Sprint 330 can correct this deficiency.

* September thru October — With the advent of cooler weather and rain, your roses will begin their heavy fall blooming season. Once you have done your light fall pruning, you can apply a cup of organic rose food per bush and follow this two weeks later with a liquid feeding. Don’t feed feed your rose after the beginning of October.

Spraying, prevention is critical in keeping your roses free of fungus and insect problems. A hit and miss program will get you and your roses into trouble. Basic spraying can be divided into three different phases.

* March thru May — Once bushes have been pruned, a clean up spray consisting of Ortho Funginex and Malathion should be applied to both the bush and the ground area around the bush. This will take care of any over wintering fungus or insect problems. Once your new growth starts, spray every seven days with Funginex, a liquid product. This fungicide has three advantages over others in that it leaves no residue, protects against mildew, blackspot and rust and needs no sticker spreader. Rust is not a big problem in my area, but does appear on occasion. Spray top and bottom of the leaves until the foliage glistens to obtain complete coverage. If your bushes should become infected with either mildew or blackspot, spray every five days until control is obtained. Insecticides such as Diazinon or Orthene can be used about every 14 days to combat most insect problems that occur during this period. Use according to label directions.

* June thru August – By this time of the year, if our weather is normally (hot and dry), you can lengthen your spraying interval for fungus problems to every 10 to 14 days. Insecticides should be used sparingly. The biggest problem that may occur at this time is an infestation of spider mites. A good way to treat this problem is to apply a hard spray of water to the bottom of the foliage every three or four days throughout the summer. This will interrupt the mites’ breeding cycle. (The bushes will also benefit from the washing). A miticide such as Green Light Red Spider Spray may also be used.

* September thru November – Once the weather begins to cool off and the early morning and nights become more humid, follow the same spray program used during the spring for both fungus and insect problems. To prevent spray bum of foliage in all seasons, water rose beds thoroughly before spraying. in hot weather, spray in early morning or late evening when temperatures are cooler.

Mulch
Using mulch, especially an organic one, is about the closest thing possible to a garden panacea. Mulch keeps weeds to a minimum, the soil moist, cool, loose and adds nutrients.

Apply mulch in the spring just as the soil warms and before weeds start coming up. Mulch can also be applied anytime during the growing season if the weeds are removed and the surface lightly cultivated. Spread 2 to 4 inches of mulch over the bed, leaving some space open around the base of each rose. Replace the mulch as it decomposes during the year.

Organic mulches, you’ll want to use whatever is locally available and cheap. Some options include wood chips and shavings, shredded bark, pine needles, or chopped oak leaves. Extra nitrogen fertilizer may be needed when these mulches are first applied. Mixtures of materials are usually more satisfactory as they have less tendency to pack down and, permit easy transmission of water and fertilizers. Many compost mixtures are available — also a light layer of manure may be applied under the mulch.

Watering
Adequate soil moisture is indispensable to the vitality of roses. (For more information, see the American Rose Society: Watering) Seldom can you rely on the natural rainfall to be adequate. The rule-of-thumb is 1 inch of water each week, but the actual frequency of watering will depend on your soil and climate as well as the age of the plant.

The goal is to slowly water until the soil is soaked 12 to 18 inches deep. Soaker hoses or a hose with a bubbler attachment are inexpensive solutions and keep water from splashing onto foliage and spreading diseases. Soil-level and drip-irrigation systems are more expensive but make watering a breeze.

Pruning controls the size and shape of roses and keeps the modern varieties blooming repeatedly all summer long. (Roses flower on new growth). The supplies you’ll need will include a good, sharp, curved-edge pruning shears, long-handled lopping shears, small pruning saw, plus a pair of leather gloves.
loving-white-rose
Well-established varieties of modern rose bushes such as hybrid teas, floribundas, and grandifloras should receive a major pruning each spring after the winter protection has been removed and just as the buds begin to swell (usually about when daffodils bloom). Hint: Harsh pruning makes bigger, but fewer blooms. Grin .. here are no reports that anyone ever killed a plant with a pair of pruning shears.

All that’s needed otherwise during the growing season is to remove and destroy any diseased foliage or canes and to dead head, or remove the faded flowers, cutting their stems just above the first leaf with five leaflets.

Unlike hybrid teas, floribundas, and grandifloras. Most old-fashioned and species roses as well as the climbers that bloom only once a year flower on wood from the previous year’s growth. They are pruned right after flowering.

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Amarillo Injures Murderous Texas Man

armadillo
Source BBC News Report
Cass County (Texas) Sheriff Larry Rowe said “the shooter opened fire in the early hours of Thursday morning when he spotted the armadillo on his property.
He went outside and took his .38 revolver and shot three times at the (small defenseless) armadillo.
The man from Texas was wounded after a bullet he fired at an armadillo ricocheted and hit the man in the head.

Grin … Armadillo serves justice to Texas man.
Being born and raised in Texas I find it totally unacceptable to kill or injure a cute defenseless Armadillo.
Hell they don’t even have teeth and are extremely near sited.

This man did not get all that he deserves, but being injured by his on actions is a good start.

Happy Gardening

Rose Garden – 1 of 3

lone-roseBush roses are generally upright growing plants that bear flowers mainly on top of the plant. Needing no support, these roses may grow from 5 or 6 inches to 5 or 6 feet tall, depending on the type and climate. The types of bush roses include hybrid teas, polyanthas, floribundas, grandifloras, miniatures, and heritage roses.

* Hybrid teas are the most widely grown of all roses. The long, narrow buds open into large, many-petaled blooms, one each to a long stem. Blooming throughout the growing season, a wide range of colors are available and many are fragrant. The upright, branching plants grow 3 feet or more tall.

* Floribundas, recognized as a group since the mid-1940’s, are derived and refined from the hybrid teas. The hardy, compact, 2- to 3-foot bushes bear great quantities of flower clusters on medium-length stems all summer long. The foliage, flower form, and color range is similar to hybrid teas, with many varieties being fragrant. They among the easiest roses to grow and are excellent for landscaping.

* Grandifloras exhibit the best attributes of hybrid teas and floribundas, although the upright bushes usually grow much larger than either, sometimes reaching 5 or 6 feet tall. This makes them striking accent plants for the back of the flower border, for example. Beautifully formed flowers are borne in clusters on long stems. They are hardy and continually in bloom.

* Miniatures roses are a tiny version of any of the other types, usually growing less than 2 feet tall. Blooms and foliage are proportionately smaller, too, but still quite perfect in form. They are hardy and excellent for edgings and mass plantings, among herbs, and in raised beds and container plants.

* Heritage, or old, roses are those that were developed by plant breeders prior to 1867, the date established by the American Rose Society in commemoration of the first hybrid tea rose, La France. Basically direct descendants of the species roses, there are many different plant and flower forms among the heritage roses. Some of these antique types include the Albas, Bourbons, Centifolias, Damasks, Gallicas, Mosses, Noisettes, and Rugosas.

Climbing Roses have long, arching canes that don’t actually climb but must be attached to supports such as trellises, arbors, posts, or fences. There are many different colors and types of blooms available. The large-flowered climbers have stiff, thick canes 10 feet or so long and bloom either continuously or at least several times during summer and fall. Ramblers have longer, thinner canes with clusters of small flowers borne once in late spring or early summer.

Shrub and Ground Cover Roses grow broadly upright with gracefully arching canes. Most are very hardy and require little maintenance. Depending on the variety, they may be 4 to 12 feet tall with many canes and thick foliage, making them ideal for hedges as well as background and mass plantings. The flowers may be single (five petals), semi-double, or double and are borne at the ends of canes and on branches along the canes. Some types bloom just once in the spring while others flower continuously during the growing season. Shrub roses frequently produce red, orange, or yellow hips (seed pods) after flowering. These are high in Vitamin C and can be used in cooking; plus, the birds like them for winter food, and they can be used in flower arrangements.

Ground cover roses are prostrate or slightly mounding plants with canes trailing along the ground. Flowers may be produced just in the spring or repeatedly throughout the summer at the ends of canes as well as on branches along the canes.
texas-yellow-rose

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Pansies Add Color To Your Fall Garden

pansies Pansies will bloom into spring through early summer, with repeat blooming in the fall. In USDA hardness zones 7 – 9 can grow pansies throughout the winter and there are newer varieties, like the ice pansy, are bred to withstand light snows.

Pansies are popular and a recognizable cool weather annuals. Breeding has produced pansies that are better able to stand up to the cold, but there hasn’t been much luck producing more heat tolerant varieties. Many pansies are bi-colored, making them striking plants for their small size. Although delicate, they are surprisingly hardy.

Compact, low growers, pansies are ideal for edging and for squeezing between rock walls and paths, as long as they can be removed in summer. They’re a great choice for early and late season containers and complement spring flowering bulbs, flowering as the bulb foliage begins to fade. If you like the variety of colors but still want a sense of cohesion, select plants from the same series. They’ll be similar in size and markings, regardless of the color.

Pansies are not fussy plants, they will grow best in a loose, rich soil with a slightly acid soil. They flower best in full sun and will get spindly in deep shade. Pansies do not like heat at all and will begin to decline as the days warm up. When buying plants, choose pansies that are stocky, bushy and have plenty of buds. Avoid buying plants with full open blooms. **Note: Pansies can be difficult to start from seed.

You can allow your pansy plants to remain in your garden and rest during the hottest months, they will probably begin blooming again in the fall. Shearing the plants back when they start to set seed, will encourage new growth. Dead heading will encourage more blooms. Occasionally aphids will attack pansies. Insecticidal soap should remove them. A mixture of ‘Blue Dawn’ dish soap is a cheap and very effective in killing aphids.

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Monday’s Thought Of The Day

An Old Man’s Perspective: Ten things to consider.

1. I’m not saying let’s go kill all the stupid people. I’m just
saying let’s remove all the warning labels and let the problem work itself out.

2. I changed my car horn to gunshot sounds. People move out of the way much faster now.

3. You can tell a lot about a woman’s mood just by her hands. If
they are holding a gun, she’s probably mad.

4. Gone are the days when girls cooked like their mothers. Now
they drink like their fathers.

5. You know that tingly little feeling you get when you really like
someone you’ve just met? That’s common sense leaving your body.

6. I don’t like making plans for the day. Because then the word
“premeditated” gets thrown around in the courtroom.

7. I didn’t make it to the gym today. That makes 1,500 days in a
row.

8. I decided to change calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.

9. Dear paranoid people who check behind shower curtains for
murderers: If you find one, what’s your plan?

10. Everyone has a right to be stupid. Politicians just abuse the
privilege.

Don’t Kiss That Chick…..en – You Can’t make This Stuff Up!

Source CDC: Don’t kiss your pet chicken

Big Smile, Just how many people do you know that gives a big old kiss to a chicken, turkey duck or goose?

Use a bit of common sense, wash your hands after handling poultry. Hehehe, wash you mouth out with soap after kissing said birds!…….

Center for Disease Control(CDC) put out a warning asking chicken owners not to snuggle or kiss their birds for fear of contracting salmonella.

Dr. Robert Glatter said “Chickens actually have salmonella naturally and they don’t get sick from it, but humans do, and the main symptoms are diarrhea, fever and abdominal pain.”

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Food Waste – Don’t Do It!


Here I go ‘Again’ my annual rant about Food Waste.

My daughter shops on Friday. Before putting away her groceries she checks the dates on food in her refrigerator and pantry. If she sees a date any date that has passed she throws out the food produce.
She refuses to believe if food is canned is frozen it is still safe to ate and sends it to the pigs.

Call me a pig. If I am present, I collect up all the food and take it home. Many time I will have 2 or sometimes 3 days worth of food that I have collected from my daughter. That’s ‘Free’ food for me.

Studies in the U.S.A. and the UK have found that the average family sends up to 1/3 (33 percent) of their food budget to the land fill needlessly. The main cause is people in general don’t understand Best used by date stamped on food packages really means.

Best if used by date Does Not, let me say that again, Does Not mean that the food has gone bad and is unsafe to eat after ‘Best used by date. What it does mean is the Length of time food retains most of its original taste and nutrition.

EXAMPLES OF SHELF LIFE:

Recent scientific studies on dehydrated(dry) foods have shown that food stored properly can last for a much longer period of time than previously thought. This research determined the “life sustaining” shelf life to be the following:

Dry Food Item Shelf Life
Wheat, White Rice, and Corn 30 years or more
Pinto Beans, Apple Slices, Macaroni 30 years
Rolled Oats, and Potato Flakes 30 years
Powdered Milk 20 years

Hint: I use 1/2 gallon and 1 gallon canning jars to store dry food products.
Fill your jars all the way to the top eliminating all air space.
Light is your enemy. Consider spray painting your jars black to protect your foods from being exposed to sun light.

U.S. Army study. If a product is correctly processed, it should remain safe until opened or the seal is broken. The U.S. Army has found that canned meats, vegetables and jam were in “excellent states of preservation” after 45 years.
However, long storage is not recommended. For high quality (versus safety), the broadest guideline given by the U.S.D.A. is to use high-acid canned food (fruits, tomatoes and pickled products) within 2 to 3 years, and low-acid (meats and vegetables) within 2 to 5 years.

Oscar Pike a food scientist at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah said “It (canned foods) lasts a lot longer than we thought. Certain foods like sugar and salt can be stored indefinitely.
In one study, researchers taste tested rolled oats that had been stored in sealed containers for 28 years. Three fourths of tasters considered the oats taste acceptable to eat.

It is important to first identify what is meant by “food storage” and “shelf life. Best if used by date “Length of time food retains most of its original taste and nutrition.
Life sustaining shelf life – Length of time food preserves life, without becoming inedible.

Food storage Hints:
Temperature: Excessive temperature is damaging to food storage. With increased temperature, proteins breakdown and some vitamins will be destroyed. The color, flavor and odor of some products may also be affected. To enhance shelf life, store food at room temperature or below; never store food in an attic or garage.

Moisture: Excessive moisture can result in product deterioration and spoilage by creating an environment in which microorganisms may grow and chemical reactions can take place.

Oxygen: The oxygen in air can have deteriorative effects on fats, food colors, vitamins, flavors, and other food constituents. It can cause conditions that will enhance the growth of microorganisms.

Light: The exposure of foods to light can result in the deterioration of specific food constituents, such as fats, proteins, and vitamins, resulting in discoloration, off-flavors, and loss of vitamins.

It is important for you to keep food stored at as cool and steady a temperature as possible (below 75 degrees but above freezing). This is the best and most important thing individuals can do to keep their long term food viable. If done correctly, your food storage could last 20-30+ years, depending on the product and storage conditions.

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Spring Flower Gardens – Plan Now!

Spring flowering bulbs, need to ordered soon, spring flower beds will need to be dug and amended with compost and fertilizer. It won’t be all that long until we are nearing the optimum planting time in northern cool/cold weather states.

Flowering bulb Planting Chart

Garlic while not a flowering spring bulb, needs to be planted about the same time you plant your spring flowering bulbs. Plant individual cloves 4 to 6 inches deep and 6 to 8 inches apart.

Bulb beds ‘Must’ be well drained. Bulbs like damp not wet soil. Bulbs exposed to prolonged periods of cool wet soil will soon rot in the ground resulting in a waste of both time and money and a failed spring flower garden.

For a longer blooming season, mix your garden with early, middle and late season blooming bulbs. Tulips and other bulbs have very well defined bloom times. A bit of research and planning can keep color in your garden for many weeks. Whether you purchase your bulbs locally or mail order them, keep your bulbs cool.
If you’ve purchased bulbs early, when you can get the best selections, store them in a cool, dark place. A basement or an unheated closet is good choice. Don’t store bulbs in plastic containers. You’ll shorten the life of your bulbs if they aren’t exposed to fresh air. Use brown paper bags or boxes. Handle your bulbs gently they are easily bruised and this may cause them to rot in the soil after planting.

Till your bulb bed soil deep as possible, 10 to 12 inches deep, amending your soil with peat moss or well decomposed compost.

Bulbs will grow better in well drained and aerated soil. Grouped, but random. Scatter bulbs randomly in groups of 6 to 18 for the best combination of color and natural appearance. Be sure to maintain the minimum spacing specified on the packaging your bulbs came in.

Proper planting is important. Dig your planting holes, see planting chart for recommended planting depth. When you place your bulb in its hole, remember roots {large} end down, pointy side up. Don’t allow your bulbs to lay on their sides when covering them with soil.

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