Old Geek’s – Gardeners – Bloggers – Over 50?

Source Signs You’re an Old Geek

This is way to good not to pass on to those of us that Do and Don’t remember yesterdays life changing technologies. Geek Things! 10 Geek Things

I found this on Fox News website. It has been edited by me.
It is authored by Steve Tobak a management consultant, former senior executive, columnist and author.

You still say “dial” the phone. That, incidentally, is a reference to a rotary telephone. What you did was stick your index finger in one of ten numbered holes on a clear piece of plastic attached to the phone and rotated it, generating electrical pulses. Yes, I know that sounds dumb. No, there was no * or # symbol. They hadn’t been invented yet.

You remember when state-of-the-art chips had dozens of transistors. Yes, I can. The first chips I designed at Texas Instruments had hundreds and that was very exciting. For the record, Apple’s A8 processor has 2 billion transistors.

You still consider “geek” to be an insult. You cringe when you hear the term that now in fact refers to tech entrepreneurs with enormous egos, bad hair and more money than God. Also Jesus actually misspoke. What he meant to say was, “The geek shall inherit the Earth.”

You had a slide rule. Slide rules were how we solved math problems in ancient times. Some of my rich college friends sported Texas Instruments SR-10 calculators but, being on a macaroni-and-cheese budget, I didn’t have $150 to spring for a gadget that just did arithmetic. SR was actually short for “slide rule.”

You owned a $5 digital watch. Come on, tell the truth; you actually thought it was cool and that analog watches were doomed.

You used punch cards. Back in the day before CRTs and keyboards we used decks of cards with holes punched in them (just like the name) to command and input data to mainframe computers. Punch card readers actually looked a little like the dealing shoes croupiers use in Las Vegas.

You remember when: bubble memories, home computers, superconductivity, pen computing, PDAs, Betamax, heads-up displays and Gallium Arsenide were all going to be the next big thing. And you probably played with Tinker Toys, Erector Sets and wooden blocks growing up and you still spin vinyl in your basement when nobody’s around.

Red Wine – Hibiscus – Rose Of Sharon – Okra

Yes … Now I have a medical excuse to drink all the red wine I can And I will.
I’ll cut back as soon as I am called that skinny guy :-) O-Happy day are here again.
Can a glass of red wine help burn fat cells?
Yea… New research suggests a chemical from the extracts in red grapes and red wine might help the body burn fat cells. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, researchers exposed human liver and fat cells in vitro to natural extracts taken from Muscadine grapes, a variety of dark-red grapes native to southeastern U.S. One of the four chemicals tested, ellagic acid did something pretty cool: it significantly halted the growth of existing fat cells, while also keeping new ones from forming.
As an added perk, it also boosted the metabolism of fatty acids in the liver cells.

Hibiscus and it’s relatives, Rose of Sharon and Okra produce beautiful blooms and comes in many colors range from white to pink, red, orange, purple or yellow. Flowers range is size from 1 1/2 to 7 inches (4–18 cm) across.

Okra is a member of the hibiscus family. Okra has one of the most beautiful blooms in the vegetable garden and can be grown almost any where for its beautiful flowers. Cooler USDA zones may have to short of a growing season to produce good fruit crops, however Okra still makes a great choice for a back of border flowering plant.

Plant okra directly in garden soil when night time temperatures remain above 55 degrees and your soil has warmed to 65 to 70 degrees.
To improve germination, soak seeds overnight in warm (Not Hot) water. Sow seeds 1/2 to 1 inch deep, 3 to 4 inches apart. Set out transplants to stand 12 to 18 inches apart in rows 24 to 42 inches apart.

Okra’s first pods will be ready in 50 to 60 days. Harvest the pods when still immature (2 to 3 inches long). Pick at least every other day to encourage production. Use a knife to cut the stem just above the cap.

Rose of Sharon generally speaking will do well in USDA zones 5-9. It can get 8′-10′ tall and have a spread of 4′-6′. Blooms colors can be white, red, lavender or light blue. Some varieties have double blooms.

Pruning Rose of Sharon. Is naturally a multi-stemmed shrub(bush), this plant can be trained through pruning to have simply one main trunk; thus some people refer to it as rose of sharon “tree.” Prune in late winter or early spring, this is one of the shrubs that bloom on the current season’s(new) growth.

Rose of sharon prefers full sun and well drained soil and good air flow around plants. Older bushes may fall prey to fungal damage if grown in areas without full sun and good ventilation.

Its attractive and plentiful blooms make’s it capable of holding its own as a specimen. One’s ability to shape rose of sharon also makes the shrub a prime candidate for hedges. It could be used to achieve privacy around swimming pools, for instance. Take advantage of this late summer flowering shrubs to keep your landscaping colorful.

It’s Not To late. If you missed it. You still have time to add your Blog to my soon to be published – Town & Country Gardening Blog Honor Roll.
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Soda Containing Caramel May Increase Cancer Risk

Just for the record I have never been a big fan of soda of any kind.
Yes I do know how difficult it is to limit or eliminate soda from children’s diet. I have a daughter, grand kids and great grand kids of my own.
At least around my house. I never buy soda of any kind. My daughter, grand kids and great grand kids know this. They know soda is not an option at grandpa’s house. They never ask for soda and drink fruit juice, milk or water.

The real question is, do you cave-in and allow your children to drink soda to stop the whining? Or do you do what is best for that child’s long term health and replace soda with milk, real natural 100% percent pure juice or water?

Source Americans at risk of carcinogen exposure from soda

Half of Americans over age 6 may be exposing themselves to a cancer causing carcinogen 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI). This compound is sometimes produced during manufacturing and is known to cause cancer.

Researchers found that 44 percent of kids and 58 percent of adults drink at least one can of soda per day. To put this 1 can a day bad habit in prospective, that’s 30 that’s right 30 – 12 can packs of soda a year. Or put this way it is 34 gallons of soda consumed in one year.

In the analysis of 4-MEI concentrations, researchers found that levels of the carcinogen varied, even for the same type of beverage. Among diet colas, certain samples had higher or more variable levels of the compound, while other samples had low concentrations of 4-MEI.

Soft drink consumers are exposing themselves to an avoidable and unnecessary cancer risk from an ingredient that is being added to these beverages mostly as a coloring agent. This unnecessary exposure poses a threat to public health and raises questions about the continued use of caramel coloring in soda.

It’s Not To late. If you missed it. You still have time to add your Blog to my soon to be published – Town & Country Gardening Blog Honor Roll.
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USDA Approves Biotech Apple

Source U.S. approves first biotech apple that resists browning

For the good or the bad of it USDA has approved a ‘Biotech’ apple.

U.S. regulators approved what is the first commercialized biotech apple, rejecting efforts by the organic industry and other GMO critics to block the new fruit. USDA said “it had determined the apples were unlikely to pose a plant pest risk to agriculture and are not likely to have a significant impact on the human environment.”

U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has approved two genetically engineered apple varieties designed to resist browning. Developed by a Canadian company, Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc.

Mmmm …. What are your thoughts on this GMO ‘Biotech’ apple being unleashed upon the world?

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DIY – Cheap And Easy – Seedling Starter Pot’s

It’s that time of the year again. Time for many of us to plant our starter seedling pots.
This is a DIY project that I posted about back in Feb. 2011 and it’s still a cheap and easy to make your own seedling starter seed pots.


I have seen these cute ‘expensive’ wood devices that can be used to make newspaper seedling starter pots. I have seen them listed on internet websites from about $25.00 to as much as $50.00. I just want pay that much for a dollar or two of wood.

Simply Flagstaff blog Has designed and provided construction details on making your very own $3.00 newspaper seedling starter pot.

I did a posting a while back about this very same subject. Home made seedling pot maker However Cindy has put me to shame. Her design is a much better design and SO easy and cheap to build about $3.00 total investment. Parts are available in any hardware store.

Cindy said” You will need the following PVC parts.
(1) – 2 inch PVC (collar) Coupling – part – #1
(1) – 1 1/2 inch PVC Dome Pipe Cap – part – #2
(1) – 1 1/2 inch PVC Bushing ——- part – #3
Assembly is super easy. Place the bushing (#3) into the dome slip cap (#2) …that’s it!!”

Hint I glued a 4 inch piece of 1 inch PVC pipe into the top of the 1 1/2 PVC Bushing. This makes it much easier to insert and remove the bushing with cap attached when pressing your news paper seedling pot’s.

Grin … maybe you can recycle all those seed catalogs into seedling pots!

Visit Simply Flagstaff blog for a lot of photographs and a detail construction and How to use your new Newspaper seedling starter pot maker.

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Setting The Record Straight

The Lie A European blogger said on their blog that Hitlers scientist invented the Microwave Oven to cook food in the field during Germany’s (WWII) attack on Russia. This blogger links to a site that repeats this invention lie.

The Truth Is: Percy Spencer invented the first microwave oven after World War II from radar technology developed during the war. Named the “Radarange”, it was first sold in 1946. Raytheon later licensed its patents for a home use microwave oven that was first introduced by Tappan in 1955, but these units were still too large and expensive for general home use. The countertop microwave oven was first introduced in 1967 by the Amana Corporation. (Thank you wikipeda)

The Lie: “90% of Americans have microwave ovens in their homes to nuke their food.

The Truth Is: Their is not now nor has there ever been nuclear materials in or used by microwave ovens. As the name suggest they use RF (radio frequency energy) produced in the EMF, Extremely High Frequency range.
This site in my opinion, appears to me to be just another Fear Mongering site that quotes at best Questionable research and is mostly based in fear based options.

In 69 years I have never heard of or seen a documented case of human injury caused by microwave ovens when (using a Microwave Oven, following manufactures instructions). Grin .. as with all things you can get a burn when carelessly removing boiling water from a microwave oven.

More Lies and Misinformation

This guy bills himself as (Dr.) Joseph Mercola when in truth he is a osteopathic physician, a (DO.) DO’s are kind-a sort-a like Medical Doctors but Not The Same.

Joseph Mercola said “The World Has Only 60 Years Worth of Topsoil Left! Wow, does this so called expert think that Top Soil is being magically transported to Mars? Maybe we will need that top soil when we land a colony on Mars.
Dip stick, we haven’t ‘Lost’ our top soil, it is still here, just in a different place on earth. Soil, Topsoil has been moving from one place to another for billions of years.

Mercola lays blame for a reduction of carbon, a by product of plant decay, on man made fertilizers. When this guy pulls his head out of his pill bottle. Maybe just maybe he will understand that almost every part of food crop plants are used in the Human food chain. The plant parts not consumed by humans are used in livestock and poultry feeds. Then the livestock and poultry are consumed by humans. That means less plant matter is plowed back into the soil.
With more than seven(7) billion hungry people to feed, few plants escape the cook pot.

Mercola said “glyphosate (commonly called Roundup) but is manufactured by many chemical producers like DOW and DuPont is the cause of a reduction in Monarch butterfly populations.
He lays blame on Americas farmers and ranchers.
What a crock of crap.

Monarch butterfly larva feed on ‘Milk weed”. Milk weed has never been a serious problem weed in cultivated farm land or grass pasture land. Contrary to this guy’s misguided opinion, farmers and ranchers do not seek out milk weeds for destruction. Nor do ranchers spray their pasture grasses with a glyphosate based herbicide.

The Truth Is: Most wide spread Monarch butterfly deaths occur in their Mexico mountain over wintering locations. Two or three days of cool weather accompanied by rain kills Monarch butterfly’s by the ten’s of thousands. ‘Not American Farmers and Ranchers.’

If you want more information about DO. Joseph Mercola take a look at FDA Orders Dr. Joseph Mercola to Stop Illegal Claims

OK I’ll get off my soap box, grin … at least for now.

Happy Spring gardening, and for my friends way south of the border I hope you have a productive fall harvest.

Blogs and Bloggers I Have Known

Elizabeth blogs at aquaberrybliss about outdoor lifestyle.
Her blog is called Aquaberry Bliss.
She features tips on gardening, outdoor excursions and sustainable living.

Eric blogs at Awakening to Awareness
Eric said “…where I share considerations for aligning our lives with what really matters.”

Antique Shop Girl blogs at The Adventures of Antique Shop Girl.
Antique Shop Girl said "Its’ a collection of short stories, antidotes, inspiration & commentary on my often humorous, sometimes poignant, but always thought-provokingly fun experiences running an antiques business in New England and online with Etsy."

The Rambling Gardener said “it’s not really about gardening. More a little bit of writing, photography and some other random thoughts and ideas.”
The Rambling Gardener blogs at The Rambling Gardener

Tom blogs at Noobish Gardener
Noobish Gardener -Life, Gardening and Whisky.

Mothers-The Life I’ve Chosen blogs at Your Super Mum said “motivators, one in a million, teachers, home-keepers, earth-savers, resourceful, supermums”

Rustedoakhomestead said “I have a brand new blog (literally just created) that will be about my adventures in diy urban homesteading, which will include all natural gardening, chicken and rabbit keeping, composting, red worm vermicomposting and other homesteading ideas like preserving/canning etc.

Steve blogs at Mr. Hopeful Steve said “I live in Suffolk, England and blog on gardens, dogs and books.

Anneli blogs at wordsfromanneli Anneli said “My blog is made up mostly of photos and stories about anything I find interesting at the time. Mostly west coast oriented, mostly outdoor things, but not exclusively.

Amy blogs at Theshrubqueen. Amy said “I blog about tropical Florida gardening, plants, dogs, garden design and life in the pond.

Áine (pronounced Aunya) blogs at áinehannah Áine said “I’m in north county Dublin, Ireland, and on ainehannah.wordpress.com, which is a chronicle of gardening in lieu of gym membership for a 50-something Jill of All Trades.

Tina blogs at Chase & Chance’s MomTina said “my blog is about trying to live the pioneer life in the new world way sharing our small farm, crafts, gardens, and simple real world cooking.

Roni blogs at Losing Screws Roni said “I’m Roni and I blog on Losing Screws. Craft and diy household projects.

Johanne Lamarche blogs at French Gardener Dishes
Johanne said “My whole life I have been told I should open a restaurant. I am French Canadian and entertaining well is part of our way of life. In the blog I try to show “how” I create recipes or entertain and even garden, creatively. My intention with blogging was to inspire others by sharing recipes, entertainment ideas/tablescapes or in the garden. I have been blogging a little more than a year.

Fairy lives in Australia and blogs at Organised Castle Fairy said “I am Fairy, live in Australia and my blog is It is a mix of gardening, cooking, sewing and decluttering.

It’s Not To late. If you missed it. You still have time to add your Blog to my soon to be publishd – Town & Country Gardening Blog Honor Roll.

Please leave me a comment or mail me:
Your (First)Name (User Name)
your Blog Name
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I will post your blog on my, soon to be published, Blog Honor Roll for all to see. Thanks

Grape Orchard – In Your Garden

Planting And Transplanting Grape Vines. In almost every USDA hardness zone, February and March is the time to plant / transplant potted and bare root grape vines.
Depending on your variety choice you can expect mature vines to produce 15 to as much as 50 pounds of grapes per vine. Do your homework, select your grape variety with care.

Do your homework. Decide it you want white or red grapes, table or wine type grapes. table and wine grapes are not interchangeable! Select your grape variety with care. Be sure your grape selection is hardy in your USDA hardness growing zone. Northern growers may find that you are somewhat limited on the varieties that will survive your winter temperatures.

Many grape varieties make he claim that they are self-fruitful(self-pollinating). I strongly recommend that you plant a minimum of two vines and that they be different varieties. Something like he Hope and Interlaken or Canadice and Flame.

I am not recommending these companies over others. However they are a good reference to learn about Grape color, taste, production and USDA zone hardness.
Burpee Company
Stark Bro’s company
University of Minnesota Is a good source on How to prune grape vines

Grape flowers and fruit are borne only on new shoots that arise from dormant buds formed on the previous season’s growth. As a shoot matures and drops its leaves, it is known as a “cane”. It is from canes that the next year’s fruiting wood is selected at pruning time.
The number of clusters that develop per shoot is a genetically controlled haracteristic of the cultivar and is not influenced much by the environment.
The number of berries per cluster, however, is greatly influenced by the health and of the vine and the envi­ronment during bloom time.

Thorough preparation of the planting site is essential to minimize weed problems and to increase the organic matter content of the soil. This should be done a year prior to planting. Problem weeds can be controlled with herbicides prior to soil preparation.
Warning 2,4-D and grapes do not go together! Even vapors given off by 2,4-D sprayed many feet from your grape orchard can cause serious plant damage.

Grapevines are host often planted in straight rows running in a North and South direction for maximum sunlight. Plant spacing, use your head, when a seller list plant with(plant spread) as 6-8 feet. To a gardener this means your grape plants must be spaced 12 to 16 feed apart. Not 6-8 feet apart.

Grape vine trellis. Must be very sturdy (heavy duty) to support the weight of your vines. Trellis support serves two purposes. (1 to hold the vine up where it can be managed and cared for efficiently, and (2 to expose a greater portion of the foliage to full sunlight, which promotes the production of highly fruitful buds.

Feeding your grape orchard. Year (1 of planting your grape orchard. Apply 4 ounces (1/2 cup) of N-P-K 10‐10‐10 fertilizer per vine soon after growth begins, and repeat this application about 4 weeks later. Spread fertilizer evenly over an area 4 or 5 feet in diameter.
Year (2 Apply 8 ounces (1 cup) of 10‐10‐10 per vine soon after growth begins, and again about 4 weeks later. Again spread evenly over an area 4 to 5 feet in diameter.
Year (2 and on, apply 1/2 lb. (1 cup) of 10‐10‐10 per each European type grapevine or 1 pound (2 cups) of 10‐10‐10 for each American type grapevine at budbreak. Spread evenly
over an area 3 to 5 feet wide on each side of vine.

This site contains easy to understand and easy to do DIY information on how to root green cuttings as well as hardwood cuttings. Never buy another expensive potted or bare root grape vine. Grow Grape Vines From Cuttings
If your lucky enough to have a friend or neighbor with grape vines, ask them if you can take a few cuttings to root and start your own grape orchard.

It’s Not To late. If you missed it. You still have time to add your Blog to my soon to be publishd – Town & Country Gardening Blog Honor Roll.

Please leave me a comment or mail me:
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Growing Figs – Planting To Harvest (pt2)

Fig Tree Figs are easy to grow even as far north as USDA zone 5.
Do your homework. Select only varieties that are cold hardy in your USDA climate zone. Decide if you want to plant directly in your garden soil or in patio container(s).

No matter what the nursery sales person say’s, even self fertile types will produce more reliably and produce more fruit if you have at least two(2) figs planted within 20 feet of each other. Six(6) to ten(10) feet apart is better.

In USDA zones 5, 6 and 7 container grown figs are not as winter hardy as garden planted figs. To survive harsh winters containers must be moved indoors to locations that will prevent your figs root system from freezing.
Garden planted figs will benefit from a heavy layer of mulch applied after your first hard freeze. Hint Celeste, Brown Turkey, Hardy Chicago, Brunswick, Marseilles, and Osborne are some of the most winter hardy cultivars.

* Figs grown as a bush or shrub are easier to protect than those in a tree form.
* Pliable branches can be pinned to the ground and covered with burlap, old blankets or tarps.
* Some growers encircle their fig plant with chicken wire and fill in with insulating leaves, and straw. The top of the plant can be covered with a plastic tarp to shed rain, sleet, and snow.
* In the spring, remove the winter protection after all danger of frost.

Figs have a shallow root system. It is best Not to distrube soil under fig trees. Mulch to control weeds and to help retain soil moisture.

In the spring prune out ground suckers and remove all dead or weak wood. Mature plants usually have 3 to 8 main stems.
Caution Your skin may become irritated from contact with the milky, latex plant sap.

Figs require Full Sun, rich well drained soils whether in containers or garden planted. In heavy clay based soils consider planting your figs in raised beds amended with well rotted compost and peat moss. In containers the addition of perlite or vermiculite will enhance soil drainage.

Figs in containers, keep figs in full sun and water regularly. When fruits begin to form apply 2 to 3 gallons of water each day.
Harvesting Hint Figs do not ripen off the plant, so they should not be picked until they are fully colored and slightly soft.

Figs as with all trees do need to be fertilized from time to time. Do Not apply a high nitrogen fertilizer to your fig trees. Use a N-P-K fertilizer like 5-10-5 or similar ratio fertilizer. In my opinion it is best to apply fertilizer at 1/4 to 1/2 it’s recommended rate. Apply fertilized when you see buds forming and again every 8 to 10 weeks until your harvest ends or your first frost.

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Growing Figs – USDA Hardiness Zones 5 To 9 (pt1)

figs Figs are not restricted to the tropics. Some Varieties of Fig will grow and over winter as far north as USDA zone 5 and as far south as USDA zone 9.

LSU Gold Fig Is a large golden fruit with a ruby blush. Fruit ripens from a light green to attractive yellow. Pulp is light red to pink. Ripe fruit has excellent, sweet fig flavor. Delectable when eaten fresh, but also dries well. This tree is a fast growering and a heavy producer.
Louisiana State University introduction.
Grow in USDA zones 7 to 9.
Grows well in containers.
Heat tolerant fruit ripens in July.
Self-pollinating.

LSU Purple Fig Grows glossy purple fruit, enjoy fresh or dried! Fruit is medium sized with a mild flavor, high sugar content, and white flesh. The pulp is light amber to light red when ripe.
Highly productive.
Pest and disease resistant.
Louisiana State University introduction. Hardy in USDA zones 7 to 9.
Grows well in containers.
Heat tolerant. Ripens from July through frost.
Self-pollinating.

Celeste Fig Hardy USDA zones 6 to 9.
Sweet with a smooth rich flavor. Fruit has violet skin and rose colored flesh. Fruit is consumed fresh, also dries well. Closed eye, when ripe helps resist splitting and souring. One of the most widely planted fig trees. Needs winter protection in USDA zones 6 and 7.
Grows well in containers.
Heat tolerant. Ripens in July.
Self-pollinating.

Chicago Hardy Fig hardy USDA zones 5 to 9.
Productive and easy to grow. Bears medium size figs. Drought tolerant once established. Plant will die back in colder climates and resume growth in spring.
Has tendency to bear fruit on new growth. Fruit produced on the old wood will appear in early summer and fruit on new growth will appear in early fall. Fruit has a dark mahogany color. (aka Bensonhurst Purple fig.)
Originates from Sicily.
Grows well in containers.
Heat and drought tolerant. Ripens in July through frost.
Self-pollinating.

Brown Turkey Fig Harty USDA zones 5 to 9.
Is a classic, all purpose fig. Fruit is delicious fresh and in preserves. Dried figs make tasty snacks all year long.
Tree needs protection when temperatures drop below 10ºF.
Needs minimal pruning and may yield 2 distinct crops in locations with a long, warm growing season.
Grows well in containers.
Heat tolerant. Ripens in June.
Self-pollinating.

UK gardeners, the Royal Horticulture Society(RHS) recommends:
‘Brown Turkey’: The classic fig for British gardens, heavy cropping, producing a mass of tasty fruit. Suitable outdoors or in containers.
* Brunswick’: Hardy and good for growing outdoors, with large, sweet fruit.
* White Marseilles’: Large fruit with sweet, translucent flesh. Ideal for growing in containers and outdoors, it produces two crops per year under glass.
* Osbourne Prolific’: Delicious dark purple fruit. For greenhouse cultivation – except in warmer climates.
* Rouge de Bordeaux’: One of the finest for flavor. Needs a warm, sheltered site or conservatory.

Australia Gardeners may want to consider:
* Adam: a large San Pedro type tree usually producing a useful Breba crop around Christmas time in SA and a major crop (which requires cross pollination with a Capri fig) in Feb. Skin is red to purple and pulp champagne to pink coloured
* White Adriatic: an early fig suited to cooler areas like the Adelaide Hills, one crop which ripens February, medium to large fruit, brownish-green skin and pink flesh, excellent fresh and very good for jam. A spreading tree
* Deanna: a large fig suited to the fresh market, green to golden skin with pink pulp, very popular in the USA
* Archipal: a large greenish-yellow fig with a very thin, edible skin and honey-coloured flesh. Early to mid season. One of our best and most reliable bearers at The Food Forest, but splits catastrophically in strong summer rains
* Flanders: a shy bearer, but good quality green skinned fruit with pink flesh
* Black Genoa (San Piero): a medium sized, pear-shaped fruit, purplish skin and red flesh, good for fresh eating but not suitable for drying. Vigorous tree, ripens Dec-Feb
* White Genoa: mid season and good in cool areas with large greenish-yellow fruit with amber flesh, good fresh eating variety and favoured for jam making. Light crop in Dec and more in Feb-Mar, unique flavour
* Preston: seems to have trouble maturing Dec-April, somewhat hairy, large green-brown fruit, white flesh, vigorous grower, high quality fruit resistant to splitting
* Brown Turkey: medium sized, late season (March), brownish striped fruit with pinkish flesh. Excellent for jam. Second crop is main crop. Hardy tree
* Spanish Dessert: late maturing, spectacular dark purple skin and dark red flesh. It has an initially distressing habit of dropping large numbers of figlets on the ground, to the point that you think the tree will lose its whole crop, but as the tree settles down it bears good crops. It has rather luxurious dark green leaves making it a lovely landscape feature
* Yellow Ischi: Small, possibly useable for jam
Excel: small, early season, light yellow skin, amber flesh, limited value for commercial market because of yields but good flavour for fresh eating
* Celeste: commercial variety in USA, violet skin, pink coloured, firm flesh, fairly cold-hardy. Very reliable cropper at The Food Forest
* Persian Prolific: strong grower, mid season fruit, light purple skin and honey coloured flesh
* Cape White: early maturing, ripens Jan, medium-sized fruit, green skin, cream coloured flesh. Great for jam, compact tree
* Smyrna: golden yellow skin and red pulp characterise this special drying, glazing, jam-making fig. It requires cross pollination (caprification) with the Capri fig

If you missed it. I will soon publish a Town & Country Gardening Blog Honor Roll.

Please leave me a comment giving me:
Your (First)Name and your Blog Name.
Your Blog URL Address.
And a short Description about your blog.
I will post your blog on my, soon to be published, Blog Honor Roll for all to see. Thanks

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