Free Two-Way Radio, No FCC License Required

I will be discussing some of the most common radio setups. There are many other methods to setup and use your radio station. A good source of information is to find and talk to one of your local Amateur Radio Operators. Often called HAMS.

Hand held No FCC License radios are a really good way to stay in contact with family members and friends during emergencies, vacations and during outdoor events like hunting and fishing.

Useful Terms:
FCC (Federal Communications Commission)
Ghz (GigaHertz) 1 billion hertz
Mhz (MegaHertz) 1 million hertz
Khz (KiloHertz) 1 thousand hertz
Hz or Kc (Hertz) 1 hertz
HF (High Frequency) 3 Mhz to 30 Mhz
VHF (Very High Frequency) 30 Khz to 300 Mhz
UHF (Ultra High Frequency) 300 Mhz to 1 Ghz
FM (Frequency Modulation)
AM (Amplitude Modulation)
SSB (Single Side Band)
CB (Citizens Band) HF band
FRS (Family Radio Service) UHF band
MURS (Multi Use Radio Service) VHF band
Marine Radio – VHV at 1 or 25 watts

FCC Allows Free No License required on several Frequency groups. This information is general in nature for more detailed information visit FCC website.

CB (Citizens Band) operates on 40 channels in the HF band at a maximum of 4 watts output power. As of this date CB are authorized to operate FM, AM and SSB modes.

Note: FM mode is a new mode allowed for use on CB band. Currently few if any CB manfacturers are offering a CB with the new FM mode.

CB radios can be either hand held or mobile mount type radios and have an effective reliable range of no more than about 3 to 5 miles. CB mobile radios most often require 12 volt power supply and external antennas.

CB Frequency CB Channel Customary Use
26.96500 CB Channel 01 open to all
26.97500 CB Channel 02 open to all
26.98500 CB Channel 03 open to all
27.00500 CB Channel 04 open to all
27.01500 CB Channel 05 open to all
27.02500 CB Channel 06 open to all
27.03500 CB Channel 07 open to all
27.05500 CB Channel 08 open to all
27.06500 CB Channel 09 Emergency
27.07500 CB Channel 10 open to all
27.08500 CB Channel 11 open to all
27.10500 CB Channel 12 open to all
27.11500 CB Channel 13 open to all
27.12500 CB Channel 14 open to all
27.13500 CB Channel 15 open to all
27.15500 CB Channel 16 open to all
27.16500 CB Channel 17 open to all
27.17500 CB Channel 18 open to all
27.18500 CB Channel 19 open to all
27.20500 CB Channel 20 open to all
27.21500 CB Channel 21 open to all
27.22500 CB Channel 22 open to all
27.25500 CB Channel 23 open to all
27.23500 CB Channel 24 open to all
27.24500 CB Channel 25 open to all
27.26500 CB Channel 26 open to all
27.27500 CB Channel 27 open to all
27.28500 CB Channel 28 open to all
27.29500 CB Channel 29 open to all
27.30500 CB Channel 30 open to all
27.31500 CB Channel 31 open to all
27.32500 CB Channel 32 open to all
27.33500 CB Channel 33 open to all
27.34500 CB Channel 34 open to all
27.35500 CB Channel 35 open to all
27.36500 CB Channel 36 open to all
27.37500 CB Channel 37 open to all
27.38500 CB Channel 38 open to all
27.39500 CB Channel 39 open to all
27.40500 CB Channel 40 open to all

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FRS (Family Radio Service) is a private, two-way, short-distance voice and data communications service for facilitating family and group activities. The most common use for FRS channels is short-distance, two-way voice communications using small hand-held radios that are similar to walkie-talkies. 1 to 3 mile range.

Below is a frequency and please note the Maximum wattage output for each frequency.

Channel No. Frequency Power (ERP in Watts)
1 462.5625 2 W
2 462.5875 2 W
3 462.6125 2 W
4 462.6375 2 W
5 462.6625 2 W
6 462.6875 2 W
7 462.7125 2 W
8 467.5625 0.5 W
9 467.5875 0.5 W
10 467.6125 0.5 W
11 467.6375 0.5 W
12 467.6625 0.5 W
13 467.6875 0.5 W
14 467.7125 0.5 W
15 462.5500 2 W
16 462.5750 2 W
17 462.6000 2 W
18 462.6250 2 W
19 462.6500 2 W
20 462.6750 2 W
21 462.7000 2 W
22 462.7250 2 W

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MURS (Multi-Use Radio Service) uses 5 channels in the 151 – 154 MHz spectrum range. The most common use of MURS channels is for short-distance, two-way communications using small, portable hand-held radios that function similar to walkie-talkies. 1 to 3 mile range.

There are five (5) MURS channels. Maximum output wattage is 2 watts.

151.820 MHz (2 watts)
151.880 MHz (2 watts)
151.940 MHz (2 watts)
154.570 MHz (2 watts)
154.600 MHz (2 watts)

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Marine (VHF) hand held or fixed station radios are an excellent investment if you spend time boating on large bodies of water. Over open water they commonly have an effective rang from 5 to 30 miles.
Marine radios are far more reliable than a cell phone, with its limited on-water range.

VHF Channel Plan

CH
Transmit
Receive
Notes
01A
156.050
156.050
(U.S.) Port Ops., Commercial, in New Orleans & Lower Mississippi
01
156.050
160.650
(Canada & International) Marine Operator
02
156.100
160.700
(Canada & International) Marine Operator
03A
156.150
156.150
(U.S.) U.S. Coast Guard
03
156.150
160.750
(Canada & International) Marine Operator
04A
156.200
156.200
(Canada) Coast Guard
04
156.200
160.800
(International) Port Ops., Commercial
05A
156.250
156.250
(U.S. & Canada) Port Ops., Houston VTS, Seattle VTS, Seattle Traffic
06
156.300
156.300
(U.S., Canada & International) Inter-ship Safety
07A
156.350
156.350
(U.S. & Canada) Commercial
07
156.350
160.950
(International) Port Ops., Commercial
08
156.400
156.400
(U.S., Canada & International) Commercial (Inter-ship)
09
156.450
156.450
(U.S., Canada & International) Boat Calling, Commercial, Non-Commercial
10
156.500
156.500
(U.S., Canada & International) Commercial
11
156.550
156.550
(U.S., Canada & International) Commercial, Berwick Bay VTS, Houston Traffic, New York VTS (Sailing), Victoria Traffic
12
156.600
156.600
(U.S., Canada & International) Port Ops., Houston Traffic, New Orleans VTS, New York VTS (Anchored), San Francisco Traffic, St. Mary’s River
13
156.650
156.650
(U.S., Canada & International) Inter-ship Navigation Safety (Bridge-to-bridge), Louisville VTS, Prince William Sound VTS
14
156.700
156.700
(U.S., Canada & International) Port Ops., Los Angeles/LB VTS, Lower Mississippi VTS, New York Traffic, Seattle VTS, San Francisco VTS
15
156.750
(U.S.) Environmental (Receive only)
16
156.800
156.800
(U.S., Canada & International) International Emergency, Distress, Safety and Calling
17
156.850
156.850
(U.S., Canada & International) State Control – 1 Watt Only
18A
156.900
156.900
(U.S., Canada) Commercial
19A
156.950
156.950
(U.S.) Commercial
20A
157.000
157.000
(U.S.) Port Ops.
20
157.000
161.600
(U.S., Canada & International) Canadian Coast Guard, Port Ops. (Repeater)
21A
157.050
157.050
(U.S. & Canada) U.S. & Canadian Coast Guard
21
157.050
161.650
(International) Port Ops., Commercial
22A
157.100
157.100
(U.S. & Canada) Coast Guard Liaison and Maritime Safety Information Broadcasts
22
157.100
161.700
(International) Port Ops., Commercial
23A
157.150
157.150
(U.S.) U.S. Coast Guard
23
157.150
161.750
(Canada & International) Marine Operator
24
157.200
161.800
(U.S., Canada & International) Marine Operator
25
157.250
161.850
(U.S., Canada & International) Marine Operator
26
157.300
161.900
(U.S., Canada & International) Marine Operator
27
157.350
161.950
(U.S., Canada & International) Marine Operator
28
157.400
162.000
(U.S., Canada & International) Marine Operator
61A
156.075
156.075
(U.S., Canada) U.S. & Canadian Coast Guard
61
156.075
160.675
(International) Marine Operator, Port Ops., Commercial
62A
156.125
156.125
(Canada) U.S. & Canadian Coast Guard
63A
156.175
156.175
(U.S.) Port Ops., Commercial, in New Orleans & Lower Mississippi
63
156.175
160.775
(International) Marine Operator, Port Ops., Commercial
64A
156.225
156.225
(U.S. & Canada) U.S. Coast Guard & Canadian Fishing
64
156.225
160.825
(International) Marine Operator, Port Ops., Commercial
65A
156.275
156.275
(U.S. & Canada) Port Ops.
65
156.275
160.875
(International) Marine Operator, Port Ops., Commercial
66A
156.325
156.325
(U.S. & Canada) Port Ops.
66
156.325
160.925
(International) Marine Operator, Port Ops., Commercial
67
156.375
156.375
(U.S., Canada & International) Commercial, Bridge-to-Bridge in lower Mississippi River
68
156.425
156.425
(U.S., Canada & International) Non-Commercial Recreation
69
156.475
156.475
(U.S., Canada & International) U.S.: Non-Commercial, Canada: Commercial
70
156.525
156.525
(U.S., Canada & International) Digital Selective Calling (Data)
71
156.575
156.575
(U.S., Canada & International) U.S.: Non-Commercial Recreation, International: Port Ops.
72
156.625
156.625
(U.S., Canada & International) Non-Commercial (Inter-ship)
73
156.675
156.675
(U.S., Canada & International) U.S.: Port Ops., Canada: Commercial
74
156.725
156.725
(U.S., Canada & International) U.S.: Port Ops., Tofino Traffic, Canada: Commercial
77
156.875
156.875
(U.S., Canada & International) Port Ops. (Inter-ship)
78A
156.925
156.925
(U.S. & Canada) Non-Commercial Recreation
78
156.925
161.525
(International) Marine Operator, Port Ops., Commercial
79A
156.975
156.975
(U.S. & Canada) Commercial, Non-Commercial in Great lakes
79
156.975
161.575
(International) Port Ops. & Commercial
80A
157.025
157.025
(U.S. & Canada) Commercial, Non-Commercial in Great lakes
80
157.025
161.625
(International) Port Ops. & Commercial
81A
157.075
157.075
(U.S. & Canada) U.S. Government Environmental Protection
81
157.075
161.675
(International) Port Ops. & Commercial
82A
157.125
157.125
(U.S. & Canada) U.S. Coast Guard & Canadian Coast Guard
82
157.125
161.725
(International) Marine Operator, Port Ops., Commercial
83A
157.175
157.175
(U.S. & Canada) U.S. Coast Guard & Canadian Coast Guard
83
157.175
161.775
(International) Marine Operator
84
157.225
161.825
(U.S., Canada & International) Marine Operator
85
157.275
161.875
(U.S., Canada & International) Marine Operator
86
157.325
161.925
(U.S., Canada & International) Marine Operator
87
157.375
161.975
(U.S., Canada & International) Marine Operator
88A
157.425
157.425
(U.S.) Commercial (Inter-ship)
88
157.425
162.025
(Canada & International) Public Correspondence (Ship-to-Coast)
AIS1
161.975
161.975
Automatic Identification System (AIS)
AIS2
162.025
162.025
Automatic Identification System (AIS)

Shortwave Bands

Frequency Range
Frequency Range
Frequency Range
2000 to 2107 kHz
8195 to 8815 kHz
19680 to 19800 kHz
2170 to 2194 kHz
12230 to 13200 kHz
22000 to 22855 kHz
4063 to 4438 kHz
16360 to 17410 kHz
25070 to 25210 kHz
6200 to 6525 kHz
18780 to 18900 kHz
26100 to 26175 kHz

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NOAA Weather Radio broadcasts on the following frequencies across the country.
Note: Even if your radio will allow you to do so DO NOT transmit on NOAA weather frequencies.

162.400 MHz 162.425 MHz 162.450 MHz 162.475 MHz
162.500 MHz 162.525 MHz 162.550 MHz

______________________________________________________________________________________

Sources include many big box stores like Walmart. Ebay is also a good source of CB and hand held radios.
Some of the Chinese made radios like Beofeng and Wouxun are well worth the money and have proven to be as good of a choice as well known names like Cobra, Motorola, Midland and Uniden.

If you want to avoid Chinese made radios good luck. To my knowledge there is not a 2 way radio currently being made in the United States.
Note: Amazon is almost always much more expensive than most other radio sellers.

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Coronavirus Death Report

Coronavirus Research Facts

Dr. John Loannidis credentials: Professor of Medicine (Stanford University) Prevention Research, of Epidemiology and Population Health and by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science.

Now Dr. Loannidis has done research find that the coronavirus’ Infection Fatality Rate (IFR) in most of the world is less than 0.20 percent, much the same as the flu.

Survivability numbers, courtesy of PJ Media.

Age Median IFR Survival Rate Estimate
0-19 0.0027% 99.9973%
20-29 0.014% 99.9860%
30-39 0.031% 99.9690%
40-49 0.082% 99.9180%
50-59 0.27% 99.7300%
60-69 0.59% 99.4100%

2,000 Gallons Water Produces 1 Pound of Almonds

California supplies about 80% of the United States almonds, and dedicates 80 million gallons, of water to grow Almond crops.
To grow one almond requires 1.1 gallons of water, and to grow a pound of Almonds takes 1,900 gallons of water. Walnuts, hazelnuts, pistachios, and cashews all use roughly the same amount of water to grow.

Ten percent of California’s water is guzzled up by almonds.

DIY Houseplant survival manuals

The complete houseplant survival manual : essential know-how to keeping more than 160 indoor plants alive.
725 Pages·2005·21.41 MB
Free download in PDF format
Houseplant survival manual

American Horticultural Society Plant Propagation: The Fully Illustrated Plant-by-Plant Manual
322 Pages·1999·87.77 MB
Free download PDF format
American Horticultural Society Plant Propagation manual

Funny Signs… You Can’t Make This Up


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That was ‘My’ Idea

In the past few weeks I have seen TV advertisement selling what looks like a 1 inch wide foam paint brush to be used in cleaning hard to reach places. TV advert special price ‘Only’ $19.95.

I have been using foam paint brushes to clean hard to reach places for many years.

Save a few dollars. Buy 1 inch wide foam brushes at Home Depot at the everyday price of $0.68 each.

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Business owner – Don’t interrupt me

Ebooks and Books in PDF format – Download for Free

I have been meaning to post this Link for a while.
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Hope you find something that makes your life easier and filled with fun.

June 6th 1944, Adolph Hitlers War Of Terror Is Challenged…


This 6th of June take time out to remember a figure in history seldom thought of by Americans. Dwight D. Eisenhower, a farm boy from the heartland of America, Kansas.

He was the right man for the job at the right time. Eisenhower wasn’t the senior general in Washington, nor did he have many years of experience commanding large armies. He was however an effective leader, administrator and as Commanding General of the European Theater of Operations his political skills were his best asset in managing all the varied allied armies in the war against Hitlers Germany. He would later (1953) be called upon to used those same political skills as President Of The United States.

Seventy nine years ago in the last week of June in 1942 an American from Midwestern farm country arrived in besieged London.

It was a business trip, of sorts. The man’s bosses had assigned him a daunting task. Summed up in a few words, that task was:
As President President Roosevelt put it “Save the world.”

England, and free Europe, were under terrible peril at the hands of Germany’s Third Reich. The British people and the British military had shown extraordinary valor, but it was not going to be enough.

Adolf Hitler didn’t realize it at the time, but the appointment and arrival of Dwight D. Eisenhowers in London meant that he (Hitler) was through.

But by June, he did go on, with the assignment of commanding all the Yanks in Europe. The invasion of North Africa would soon follow. Then, having been promoted to supreme commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force, Eisenhower would direct the largest combined sea, air and land military undertaking in the history of the world: Operation Overlord, the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. England, and Europe, and the free world would survive and prevail.

All was not easy every decision was not without its critics, both at the time and in the ensuing years. Some strategies did not work out the way he had hoped and planned for. Eisenhower himself realized this, and was at peace with it.
After the war, remembering his arrival in London, he would write: “War, as so many men have said, is the most stupid and tragic of human ventures.
It is stupid because so few problems are enduringly solved; tragic because its cost in lives and spirit and treasure is seldom matched in the fruits of victory. Still, I never intend to join myself with those who damn all wars as vile crimes against humanity.
World War II, not sought by the people of the United States or its allies, was certainly not, on their part, either stupid or in vain.
Satisfaction, and memories precious beyond price, rewarded those who survived and who, in loyalty to country and to ideals, answered the attack.”