Tag Archives: Health

Quick and Easy Winter Soup

Leek and potato soup:

2 – large leeks
2 – medium potatoes peeled and course chopped
1 – pint stock – or use 1 – stock cube (use the stock you like, beef, chicken or vegetable)
Salt (Taste ‘Before) adding salt, stock often contains salt
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground white or black pepper
Optional 2 – tablespoons butter
Optional – fresh mushrooms course chopped (thin sliced)

Course slice leeks and sauté them in 2 tablespoons olive or canola oil or melted butter.
Pour in the stock, add the potatoes and mushrooms. Simmer for about 25 minutes.
Soup is ready when the potatoes are soft and tender.
Top off with additional stock if needed.
Optional – Make this into a ‘cream’ soup. Blend in 4 ounces (1/2 cup) of cream. Do not boil.
Serve warm with toasted buttered garlic bread or saltine crackers.

Chili soup:

1 – 15 ounce can Wolf brand chili (with or without beans)
15 – ounces water
1 – Tablespoon chili powder
1 – Tablespoon dried oregano

Optional: 2 – tablespoons fresh chopped cilantro
Optional: 1 – tablespoon fresh chopped thyme
Optional: 1 or 2 – fine diced fresh hot or mild green or red pepper.
Optional: Fine diced onion to taste.

Heat chili soup to a simmer.

Serve hot topped with shredded sharp cheddar cheese, warm soft flour tortilla’s, corn chips or saltine crackers.
Optional: Serve with a side dipping dish of green or red salsa hot or mild, the kind you like.

Chili pepper consumption could help you live longer

hot-red-pepper Chili pepper report The American Heart Association said “research has suggested that regular chili pepper consumers could have longer lifespans due to the fruit’s anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer and blood-glucose regulating properties. These factors play a role in reducing a person’s risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease or cancer.

570,000 health records were included in these studies, which included people from the U.S., Italy, China and Iran. The people who ate chili peppers regularly had a 26% relative reduction in cardiovascular mortality; 23% relative reduction in cancer mortality; and 25% relative reduction in all-cause mortality.

Garden Fresh Potatoes

North American gardeners grow potatoes that generally fall into 1 of 6 color categories.

University of Minnesota potato growing fact website has a lot of useful information on growing potatoes.

Blue skin with white or blue flesh
Brown skin with white or yellow flesh like
Purple skin with white, yellow or purple flesh
Red skin with white, yellow or red flesh
White skin with white or yellow flesh
Yellow skin with white or yellow flesh

Start your potato plants from tubers or pieces of tubers. Buy disease free seed tubers from a certified grower or seed distributor. Most garden centers carry seed potatoes in the spring.

Potatoes saved from your own garden may not be a good choice either. They can carry disease spores from the previous year. Although your garden may seem disease free, re-introducing more fungi or bacteria could cause crop failure for your potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and eggplant in the future.

Hint: Do not plant potatoes purchased at the grocery store, they may have been treat with chemicals to keep tubers dormant(prevents sprouting), in which case they will be slow to grow.
Diseases may also infect the potatoes, which can remain in your garden soil for many years. Also they may have been treated with pesticides to kill insects that can damage potatoes that have been placed in storage.

Plant your seed potato sections about 3 inches deep. The depth allows the potatoes to form without breaking the surface and causing green spots on the potatoes. When a tuber is exposed to light for an extended period of time, a poisonous alkaloid is produced that turns the potato green.

Before planting, add a fertilizer with a NPK rating 10-10-5. Mix the fertilizer in with the soil as you till to evenly disperse the fertilizer. If you use an organic fertilizer, such as cow or horse manure, make sure the manure is well-rotted or at least a year old. Fresh manure causes the planting bed to get too “hot” and burns the plants.
Potato seeds prefer a cooler temperature to set roots. The ideal soil temperature for planting seed potatoes is around 55 degrees Fahrenheit.

Hill soil up around plants as they grow. Tubers will form on thin stems, called stolons, which emerge from the main stems. The deeper in the soil the underground portion of the plant, the more stolons the plant may grow.

Potatoes are both water loving and heavy feeders of fertilizer. Moisture stress can cause knobby or hollow potatoes, and can prevent the plant from producing new tubers. Light soil is the best for growing large, smooth potatoes. Soak the soil thoroughly when watering, once or twice a week.

You can dig new potatoes about seven to eight weeks after planting. New potatoes will have formed above the seed piece you planted, so dig down about a foot, and turn the whole plant upside down to pick the tubers.
Harvest mature tubers after the plants have dried(look dead) or when tubers have reached full size.

How to catch a deer for thanksgiving dinner

I laughed the whole time I read this.

(A letter from someone who wants to remain anonymous, who farms and actually tried this)

I had this idea that I could rope a deer, put it in a stall, feed it up on corn for a couple of weeks, then kill it and eat it. The first step in this adventure was getting a deer. I figured that, since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not seem to have much fear of me when we are there (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck not 4 feet away), it should not be difficult to rope one, get up to it and toss a bag over its head (to calm it down) then hog tie it and transport it home.

I filled the cattle feeder then hid down at the end with my rope. The cattle, having seen the roping thing before, stayed well back. They were not having any of it. After about 20 minutes, my deer showed up– 3 of them. I picked out a likely looking one, stepped out from the end of the feeder, and threw my rope. The deer just stood there and stared at me. I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so I would have a good hold.

The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation. I took a step towards it, it took a step away. I put a little tension on the rope, and then received an education. The first thing that I learned is that, while a deer may just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, they are spurred to action when you start pulling on that rope.

That deer EXPLODED. The second thing I learned is that pound for pound, a deer is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could fight down with a rope and with some dignity. A deer– no Chance. That thing ran and bucked and twisted and pulled. There was no controlling it and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer on a rope was not nearly as good an idea as I had originally imagined. The only upside is that they do not have as much stamina as many other animals.

A brief 10 minutes later, it was tired and not nearly as quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me when I managed to get up. It took me a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded by the blood flowing out of the big gash in my head. At that point, I had lost my taste for corn-fed venison. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope.

I figured if I just let it go with the rope hanging around its neck, it would likely die slow and painfully somewhere. At the time, there was no love at all between me and that deer. At that moment, I hated the thing, and I would venture a guess that the feeling was mutual. Despite the gash in my head and the several large knots where I had cleverly arrested the deer’s momentum by bracing my head against various large rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to recognize that there was a small chance that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility for the situation we were in. I didn’t want the deer to have to suffer a slow death, so I managed to get it lined back up in between my truck and the feeder – a little trap I had set before hand…kind of like a squeeze chute. I got it to back in there and I started moving up so I could get my rope back.

Did you know that deer bite? They do! I never in a million years would have thought that a deer would bite somebody, so I was very surprised when ….. I reached up there to grab that rope and the deer grabbed hold of my wrist. Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like being bit by a horse where they just bite you and slide off to then let go. A deer bites you and shakes its head–almost like a big dog. They bite HARD and it hurts.

The proper thing to do when a deer bites you is probably to freeze and draw back slowly. I tried screaming and shaking instead. My method was ineffective.

It seems like the deer was biting and shaking for several minutes, but it was likely only several seconds. I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning that claim by now), tricked it. While I kept it busy tearing the tendons out of my right arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose.

That was when I got my final lesson in deer behavior for the day.

Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear right up on their back feet and strike right about head and shoulder level, and their hooves are surprisingly sharp… I learned a long time ago that, when an animal -like a horse –strikes at you with their hooves and you can’t get away easily, the best thing to do is try to make a loud noise and make an aggressive move towards the animal. This will usually cause them to back down a bit so you can escape.

This was not a horse. This was a deer, so obviously, such trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different strategy. I screamed like a woman and tried to turn and run. The reason I had always been told NOT to try to turn and run from a horse that paws at you is that there is a good chance that it will hit you in the back of the head. Deer may not be so different from horses after all, besides being twice as strong and 3 times as evil, because the second I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down.

Now, when a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does not immediately leave. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger has passed. What they do instead is paw your back and jump up and down on you while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head.

I finally managed to crawl under the truck and the deer went away. So now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring a rifle with a scope……to sort of even the odds!!

All these events are true so help me God…An Educated Farmer

After reading this I can understand why someone would want to remain anonymous.

I’m so proud of (DT) my grand daughter in law. Muzzle loader deer season opened on the 24 of October. On the afternoon of the 24th she came to my house wanting to borrow my Thompson Center 50 caliber muzzle loading rifle to go deer hunting.
This was DT’s first deer hunt, she was to hunt alone, she had never loaded or fired a muzzle loader.

I spent 15 or 20 minutes showing her how to load, cap and how to use double set triggers. She went to the back of our place crawled up into my deer stand to wait for a deer.

Grin… she was back at my house in about 30 minutes asking me to help her carry the 6 point whitetail buck that she had shot back to the barn.
You guested it, she didn’t have a clue how to gut, skin or cut up the meat before wrapping in butcher paper to put in her deep freeze.

Image

Bar’s Public Notice Sign Board

Mediterranean style white bean soup

What you will need for this bean soup recipe.

1 lb. white beans
1 cup crushed, chopped or diced canned or fresh tomatoes
1/2 cup chopped celery
1 large white or 2 smallish sized chopped/diced onions
3 small, course diced carrots
1/2 cup olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoon salt {start with 1 teaspoon add more to your taste}
1/4 teaspoon pepper, or to taste1 1/2 tablespoons fresh chopped herbs, such as parsley, oregano, basil or chives
8 cups water
* Optional 1/2 cup white wine
* Optional 4 cups chicken or beef broth and 4 cups water
* Optional 1 or 2 garlic cloves minced or finely chopped
* Optional 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes.

Soak beans over night, drain off the water and put beans in a saucepan with 8 cups water or 4 cups chicken or beef broth and 4 cups water.

Bring to a boil on medium-high heat, reduce heat and allow to simmer for 45 minutes on low heat.

Add remaining ingredients and cook gently for about an hour or until the beans and vegetables are tender. Add more water if needed.

Garnish soup with grated cheese, fresh chopped Chives, Oregano, Basil or Parsley. Use the kind of herbs and cheese you like as a garnish.

Serve with hard crust bread or buttered garlic bread.
Grin… Americans some time serve this soup with saltine crackers or fresh baked cornbread.

Kale – Good And Good For You

Kale is becoming one of American gardeners favorite green vegetables. Lettuce and spinach are being replaced by Kale as a favorite fresh salad and cooked table green.

Growing Kale Kale likes Full Sun and grows best in a loamy soil with a neutral pH to slightly alkaline soil.

Kale is a hardy, cool season green
that is part of the ‘cole’ cabbage family. It grows best in the spring and fall and can tolerate Fall frosts. Kale can be used in salads or as a garnish and is rich in minerals and vitamins A and C. You can plant kale anytime from early spring to early summer.

If you plant kale late in the summer you can harvest it from fall until the ground freezes in winter. Mix 1-1/2 cups of NPK 5-10-10 fertilizer per 25 feet of row into the top 3 to 4 inches of soil. Plant the seeds 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep into well-drained, light soil. After about 2 weeks, thin the seedlings so that they are spaced 8 to 12 inches apart. Water the plants regularly.
Mulch the soil heavily after the first freeze.
The plants may continue to produce leaves throughout the winter. Kale is ready to harvest when the leaves are about the size of your hand.

Avoid picking the terminal bud (found at the top center of the plant) this will help to keep the plant productive. The small, tender leaves can be eaten uncooked and used in salads. Cut and cook the larger leaves like spinach, remove the large tough leaf ribs before cooking.

Store kale as you would any other leafy green. Put kale in a bag and store it in the refrigerator. It should last about 1 week.

Consider planting,
* ‘Vates’, which is a hardy variety and does not yellow in cold weather. It also has curly, blue-green leaves.
* ‘Winterbor’, which resembles the ‘Vates’ variety, and it is frost tolerant.
* ‘Red Russian’, which has red, tender leaves and is an early crop.

brusselkale Source FOX News Report
A new hybrid from U.K. vegetable breeder Tozer Seeds that’s a hybrid (Not a GMO) of two super trendy vegetables, Brussels sprouts and kale.
BrusselKale is set to make its North American debut in Toronto later this month.
According to Tozer Seeds, the leafy green vegetable gets its “fantastic flavor by combining the complex taste of the Brussels sprout with the mild, sweet ‘nutty’ taste of the kale.”
Note: I have looked on Tozer Seeds web site and can’t seem to find this Brussels sprout/Kale hybrid listed in their catalog.

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Chow Chow using green tomato’s and excess garden vegetables

Posted September 2017. Reworked and updated.

Homemade Green Spicy Relish.

Over run with green tomato’s? Fall gardens are winding down. Many gardeners have a lot of green tomato’s and Chow Chow is a healthy good tasting way to use them before they are damaged by freezing weather.

Chow Chow was born in North America out of an effort to preserve the excess summer produce growing in the backyard, on small farms including green tomatoes, cabbage, hot peppers, bell peppers, onions, and more.
Chow Chow recipes vary widely based on what part of North America you live. Chow Chow consist primarily of chopped green tomatoes, cabbage, onion, and peppers while others can contain ripe tomato’s, carrots, beans, cauliflower, or peas. Regardless of which one you choose, the ingredients are all pickled and packed in canning jars and served cold as a condiment.

Use Chow Chow as you would any other kind of pickled relish. Use it as a topping for hot dogs, hamburgers, or barbeque. It’s also commonly used to give a little spunk to a bowl of beans or a side of cornbread. You can even make a delicious appetizer by adding a little atop a cracker with cream cheese spread.

Chow Chow pairs well with pinto or white beans, hotdogs, burgers, BBQ, chili, stew and just about any other food needing a sweet/sour spicy taste boost.

Grandma’s CHOW CHOW

1 peck (1/4 bushel) green tomatoes about 12 to 15 pounds
5 lbs. yellow onions
1 large head of cabbage course chopped (like you were making coleslaw)
5 lbs. cane sugar
5 red hot chili peppers {you need at least 2 of these and more if you like your chow chow hot and spicy}
4 chopped sweet green bell peppers
4 chopped sweet red bell peppers
2 tablespoons mustard seed
1 tablespoon turmeric
2 tablespoons celery seed
1 package of pickling spices
About 1 quart of 5% acid apple cider vinegar

Dice tomatoes and sprinkle with 1 cup salt, place them in a clean old white pillowcase and hang them from a close line pole over night. {This will remove most of the green tomato juice from your bag of diced green tomato’s.} I’ll bet wrapping your tomato’s in cheese cloth would work just as well.
* Hint: Better yet course grind all of your vegetables in a meat grinder or chop using a food processor.

Chop/grind all vegetables and combine in a large kettle. Stir in salt, let stand covered at room temperature overnight, or at least 8 hours. Using a colander drain chopped vegetables.

Rinse and drain green tomato’s and other vegetables only once.
In a large pot, add chopped/ground tomatoes, cabbage, onions, peppers, sugar and spices and enough vinegar to almost cover. Cook (simmer) uncovered over a very low heat for 4 hours. Adding additional 1/2 vinegar and 1/2 water mixture as necessary.
After 3 1/2 hours or so of cooking time, taste and adjust salt and spices if needed.

Fill hot sterilized canning jars to 1/2 inch from the top and secure lids to jars.
Note: Sterilize jars in a boiling water bath insuring jars are completely covered with water. Don’t forget to sterilize jar tops as well.

Process in a boiling water bath for 15 to 20 minutes. Allow jars to cool over night. Check to insure all jars sealed properly. Any jar that did not properly seal should be refrigerated and consumed with in a week or so.

* Hint: Adjust the vegetables used based on what vegetables are excess to your needs to be eaten fresh from your garden.

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Flu and Pneumonia Vaccinations – a life or death disease

Cutting the risk of flu will help the health system better manage the rise in Covid-19 cases.
Anyone who becomes co-infected with flu and coronavirus could end up with a very “severe illness or die. All measures possible are needed to reduce the risk of flu infection.

Because flu and coronavirus share similar symptoms flu has the potential to complicate the vital work of the contact tracing and surveillance programs. The flu is a very unpleasant illness, but in some cases those in ‘at-risk’ groups (the very young and the over 60) it can be very dangerous and sometimes fatal.

Get your Flu and Pneumonia vaccinations as soon as possible. The vaccinations are low cost and in many cases ‘free’.

A day or two ago I got my Flu and Pneumonia vaccinations for ‘Free’ at CVS pharmacy.

Fall Harvest and Winter storage

Most areas in North America it’s not to late to harvest crops that are to be stored for winter use. Here is a bit of information that ‘Generally’ applies to harvesting / storing Fall/autumn harvested crops.

* Do not wash freshly harvested vegetables. After digging, wipe dirt off root crops such as onions, garlic, potato’s of all kinds, turnips and such.
* Removing vegetable foliage(tops) cut about 1 inch above your vegetable. Do not remove vegetable roots. Small hair like roots can be ‘brushed’ off by hand once your vegetable has hardened off. (Skin has dried and become tough).
* Winter squash and gourd harvesting. Cut vine stem leaving 1 to 2 inches of the stem attached to the squash or gourd.
* Apples and pears that you wish to put in winter storage should be treated much as you do root crops. Allow them to harden off a few days before being boxed for winter storage.

Hint Frost and rain is not your friend. Fruits and vegetables must be protected from being rained on or being exposed to frost or freezing temperatures. If rain or frost is in your forecast, move your fruits and vegetables into a dry frost free area during the hardening off process.

Carefully inspect your fruit and vegetables at harvest time. Fruits and vegetables having harvest or insect damage should be consumed within 1-3 days or you should cut away damaged areas and can or freeze them for later use.
If you can not can or freeze damaged fruit or vegetables, feed them to your chickens or livestock. As a last resort chop them and add to your compost pile. Grin .. if you don’t have a compost pile, get one!

Note Sweet Potato’s is most likely the most temperature sensitive vegetable you will have to deal with during you fall harvested vegetables. Sweet Potato’s are extremely sensitive to wet and frost damage. If your garden is hit by an unexpected frost, (1) cut at ground level and remove potato vines. (2) Dig sweet potato’s within 1 day or at most 2 days to salvage your potato crop.
Under these conditions a good option is to can or freeze potato’s after digging.

Harding off can be accomplished in about 10 to 14 days. During hardening off process, keep vegetables and fruits in a dry frost free place. The best temperature is 75 to 80 degrees.
After hardening off fruits and vegetables in a dry, well ventilated area winter storage at 55 to 60 degrees is idea with a relative humidity of 75 percent to 80 percent if possible.

I am a Lazy old guy Being frugal, not cheap, I don’t find it necessary or productive to re-type information that others have researched and put in print. The links I have provided are to the best of my knowledge, correct and cut to the chase without the need to swamp the reader with a lot of junk products.

NGA Harvesting Sweet Potato’s
NGA Harvesting Potato’s
NGA Harvesting Onions
Harvesting and Storing Garlic

Not from the U.S.A. Leave a comment telling me about your home town and country

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