Life and Death in Southwest Oklahoma

The months of June and the first 15 days of July, (45 days), has seen 2.47 inches (6.27cm) of rain fall. All but the hardiest plant life is dieing or going dormant waiting for the fall rains to bring it back to life. Even the heat loving drought resistant Sun Flowers are needing a drink of cool water.
The soil is hot, dry and hard as sun baked adobe bricks.

Those boys and girls at the National Weather Service located in Norman, Oklahoma say I can expect to see more of the same for the next 10 days or so. No rain and temperatures at or very near 100 degrees with low or very low humidity and high to very high UV index.

All and all about normal June – July weather for my little part of Southwest Oklahoma.

About the only thing not showing signs of drought stress is my Mesquite trees. Those boys at Texas A and M University tell me mesquite trees have been known to extend their root system 200 feet below ground and horizontally far beyond the plants canopy.

I have started using tap water delivered via water hose to keep my newer planted trees from dieing from lack of water. I water slowly and deeply putting out about 3 to 5 gallons per hour of water targeted at the trees active root zone.

On the bright side we have had very few 100+(37.8C) degree days so far this season. That translates to money saved by needing to run the AC fewer hours each day to keep my living space cool.

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10 responses to “Life and Death in Southwest Oklahoma

  1. Oh I don’t think I’d like that on a regular basis! We experienced a drought last year (I’m in Ireland) and it was terrible. The countryside, which is normally ’40 shades of green’, was 40 shades of brown! I hope your new trees make it to the rains!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you.
      Those of us that choose to live here soon learn how to adapt to both the heat and the dry rain less days, sometimes weeks without measurable summer rains.
      Happy Gardening

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  2. oh – so familiar here in Central Texas. Only up to 98 so far today but we’ve been “promised” we’ll reach 100 this week – that’s one promise I hope doesn’t get kept!
    Our “sandwich family” situations have really messed up my gardening the last several years but I’m hoping I will at least get some wild mustang grapes and some escarpment cherries picked in the next two weeks so I can “make” juice to freeze and make jellies later. I’ve now missed the local dewberries for 5 years and a row! Wish me luck with the grapes and the cherries and on getting at least a small fall garden this year.
    Keep those precious trees happy! They do an awful lot of good stuff for just a relatively little bit of water!
    By the way, did you ever pick off the fresh “sap” that oozes from the branches of mesquite trees? I used to love to stretch out on a horizontal branch with a good book, pick off some soft “sap” and chew it while I read. Reminiscence. . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    • Good luck with your grape and cherry picking.
      The mesquites we have here are not the same as the types found in central and southwest Texas. These would be better called bushes not trees. A large one will get about 4 or 5 inches in diameter at it’s base and reach a mature height of 8 or maybe 10 feet tall.
      Happy Gardening

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  3. Wow! I thought it was hot in Florida, stay cool.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. We all love sunny days, but when it doesn’t rain for a long time, things can look desperate for plants. I’d be happy to send you some of our winter rain to use in the summer. If only we could do that!

    Liked by 1 person

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