Tag Archives: freedom

June 6th 1944, Adolph Hitlers War Of Terror Is Challenged…


This 6th of June take time out to remember a figure in history seldom thought of by Americans. Dwight D. Eisenhower, a farm boy from the heartland of America, Kansas.

He was the right man for the job at the right time. Eisenhower wasn’t the senior general in Washington, nor did he have many years of experience commanding large armies. He was however an effective leader, administrator and as Commanding General of the European Theater of Operations his political skills were his best asset in managing all the varied allied armies in the war against Hitlers Germany. He would later (1953) be called upon to used those same political skills as President Of The United States.

Seventy nine years ago in the last week of June in 1942 an American from Midwestern farm country arrived in besieged London.

It was a business trip, of sorts. The man’s bosses had assigned him a daunting task. Summed up in a few words, that task was:
As President President Roosevelt put it “Save the world.”

England, and free Europe, were under terrible peril at the hands of Germany’s Third Reich. The British people and the British military had shown extraordinary valor, but it was not going to be enough.

Adolf Hitler didn’t realize it at the time, but the appointment and arrival of Dwight D. Eisenhowers in London meant that he (Hitler) was through.

But by June, he did go on, with the assignment of commanding all the Yanks in Europe. The invasion of North Africa would soon follow. Then, having been promoted to supreme commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force, Eisenhower would direct the largest combined sea, air and land military undertaking in the history of the world: Operation Overlord, the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. England, and Europe, and the free world would survive and prevail.

All was not easy every decision was not without its critics, both at the time and in the ensuing years. Some strategies did not work out the way he had hoped and planned for. Eisenhower himself realized this, and was at peace with it.
After the war, remembering his arrival in London, he would write: “War, as so many men have said, is the most stupid and tragic of human ventures.
It is stupid because so few problems are enduringly solved; tragic because its cost in lives and spirit and treasure is seldom matched in the fruits of victory. Still, I never intend to join myself with those who damn all wars as vile crimes against humanity.
World War II, not sought by the people of the United States or its allies, was certainly not, on their part, either stupid or in vain.
Satisfaction, and memories precious beyond price, rewarded those who survived and who, in loyalty to country and to ideals, answered the attack.”

Memorial Day – Monday, May 25th, 2015

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in service of the United States of America.

Memorial Day was borne out of the Civil War and a desire to honor our dead. It was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11. “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land,” he proclaimed. The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any particular battle.

Please note that it is observed in almost every state on the last Monday in May with Congressional passage of the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90 – 363). This helped ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays.
All though several southern states have an additional separate day for honoring the Confederate war dead. January 19th in Texas, April 26th in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi, May 10th in South Carolina and June 3rd (Jefferson Davis’ birthday) in Louisiana and Tennessee.

National Moment of Remembrance
“National Moment of Remembrance” resolution was passed on Dec 2000 which asks that at 3 p.m. local time, for all Americans “To voluntarily and informally observe in their own way a Moment of remembrance and respect, pausing from whatever they are doing for a moment of silence or listening to ‘Taps.”
Even if it in not at 3 p.m., Please take a few moments to remember all those that have died in the of the United states, in defending Freedom of all of Americas citizens.

peace rose Remember our fallen hero’s.
Plant a Peace rose.

Vietnam War Casualties List This site allows you to search my Date, Militry Unite, Last Name and by Branch Of Service.