Tag Archives: ducks

Judge rules ‘ duck’s have the right to ‘Quack’

Ducks have won: French court rules they may keep on quacking.
Ducks on a small French smallholding may carry on quacking, a French court ruled, rejecting a neighbor’s complaint that the birds’ racket was making their life a misery.

The complaint was brought by Douthe’s neighbor who moved from the city around a year ago into a property about 50 meters (yards) away from the enclosure in the Soustons district where Douthe keeps her flock.

City dwellers that move to the country side should be required to certify in writing that they understand poultry, waterfowl cows and goat bells are common sounds that occur when living in the country and city folk will not be allowed to disturb their neighbors life’s with lawsuits that may relate to life in the country or that may effect farmers lives.

Remember Maurice? A judge ruled a rooster named Maurice was allowed to continue his dawn crowing, despite complaints from neighbors who had also moved in from the city.

Poultry Flock – on your Homestead or in your Back Yard


I WANT TO GROW MORE OF MY OWN FOOD
Can anyone tell me where I can buy ‘Bacon Seed’

Hint: One(1) hen will on average lay one(1) egg every 27 hours. Two hens produce more than a dozen eggs a week. You do the math, how many hens does your family need to supply all the eggs your family actually consume.

Chicken chicks, Turkey poults, Ducklings and Goslings will soon be arriving at your local farm store. Second choice is to mail order your flock from a reliable hatchery.

There are hundreds of breeds of Chickens, Ducks, Geese and Turkeys. I will ‘Only’ discuss the breeds that I commonly raise and have had good success surviving Oklahoma’s hot dry summers and cold windy winters.

Chicks will start being available from about the third week of February.
Duck will start being available from about the first week of February.
Geese will start being available from about the last week of March.

There are a few breeds that are on the top of many growers must have list.

Chickens: White leghorns of Fog Horn Leghorn fame, are the choice of commercial egg producing farms.
white leghorn Type: White Leghorn
Egg Color: white, Egg Size: extra large, Egg Production: excellent
Meat Production: fair, Heat/cold Tolerance: Good
Disposition: poor, Weeks to Maturity: 18, Free-range: good
Will not go broody
Male Mature Weight: 6 lbs, Female Mature Weight: 4.5 lbs or less.

Rgode island Type: Rhode red, Egg Color: brown, Egg Size: extra large,
Egg Production: excellent, Heat/cold Tolerance: good
Disposition: good, Weeks to Maturity: 19, Free-range: good
Will not go broody, Bird Size: extra large
Male Mature Weight: 8.5 lbs, Female Mature Weight: 6.5 lbs or less

barred rock Type: Barred rock, Egg Color: brown, Egg Size: large
Egg Production: excellent, Meat Production: excellent
Heat/cold Tolerance: good, Disposition: good, Weeks to Maturity: 20
Free-range: good, Not very likely to go broody, Bird Size: large
Male Mature Weight: 9.5 lbs, Female Mature Weight: 7.5 lbs

Black Australorps Type: Black Australorps, Egg Color: brown, Egg Size: large
Egg Production: excellent, Meat Production: excellent
Heat/cold Tolerance: good, Disposition: good, Weeks to Maturity: 20
Free-range: excellent, Not likely to go broody, Bird Size: extra large
Male Mature Weight: 8.5 lbs, Female Mature Weight: 6.5 lbs

Buff Orpingtons Type: Buff Orpingtons Egg Color: brown, Egg Size: large
Egg Production: execellent Meat Production: excellent, Heat/cold Tolerance: good Disposition: good, Weeks to Maturity: 20, Free-range: good
Very Likely to go broody, Bird Size: extra large
Male Mature Weight: 10 lbs, Female Mature Weight: 8 lbs

Hint: Rooster(s) Are Not required for your pullets/hen to lay eggs. They are Only need if you want or need fertile eggs for hatching replacement chicks.

Ducks not anything like Daffy duck. Ducks are quite birds, can be housed with chickens.
white_pekin Type: White Pekin, excellent meat quality, Egg production excellent
Male and female are creamy white in color, yellow skinned, and very large breasted.
Male mature weight: 10 to 11 pounds, Females mature weigh: 8 to 9 pounds.
The easiest domestic ducks to pick and prepare for eating.

rouen Type: Rouen, attractive colorful ducks bear the name of the French city they originally came from.
Egg production: fair, excellent meat bird,
Male mature weight: 8 to 9 pounds, Females mature weight: 6 to 7 pounds.

Geese Geese are noisy and can become aggressive, can be housed with chickens.
toulouse_goose Type: Toulouse, Taking their name from a city in France, along with White Embdens are the most popular commercial geese sold in America.
Meat production: excellent all-dark meat, Egg production: fair
Male mature weight: 18 to 20 pounds, Female mature weight: 12 to 13 pounds.

Turkeys Are noisy birds and males (Toms) can become aggressive.
Turkeys ‘Should Not’ be housed with chickens.
white_turkey Type: White turkey, most common commercially grown turkey.
Meat production: White broad breasted turkeys are the most popular.
Egg production: poor
Easy to dress
Male mature weight: 45 pounds, Female mature weight 25 pounds.

broadbreasted_bronze_turkey Type: Broadbreasted Bronze
Meat production: excellent, Egg production: poor
Male mature weight 38 pounds, Female mature weight: 22 pounds
Stately lords of the barnyard, metallic sheen of the feathers changes from copper to bronze to burnished gold as the light moves across them. Four feet in length, six feet from wing tip to wing tip.

McMurray Hatchery link is provided as a reference source for learning about poultry breeds,. Here you will find a short description, pictures as well as other useful information on raising your birds.
$10.00 DIY Chicken Plucker
DIY Poultry Brooder

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Chicken Coop Poop – Poultry Coop – A Fall And Winter Project

The term chicken coop is a generic term. Your coop will work equally well for housing chickens, ducks, turkeys and geese or game birds.

Many people raise ornamental birds. When considering raising ornamental birds it is advisable to make your coop and outside runs at least 2 or even 4 times normal size to prevent plumage damage from outside run wire or a smallish coop.

If you put a poultry wire top on your outside run to prevent them flying out of your pen. You can also raise game type birds like guinea fowl, quail, pigeons, and pheasants. Some people refer to this arrangement as a fly pen.

When designing and constructing a fly pen don’t make the mistake of making it so low to the ground that you can not walk erect in the pen. Unless you are 3 foot 9 inches tall, a four(4) foot tall fly pen is way to low. Think about making your fly pen at least 6 feet tall.

Being frugal ‘Not Cheap’ I always start my new projects by visiting my local hardware (lumber) store. I ask them if they have any ‘Damaged’ lumber on sale at a bargain price. Warped or bowed lumber will work just fine in constructing your poultry house, outside run or fly pen. Damaged lumber can often be purchased for less than 1/2 the price of prime construction materials. Your poultry really will not care if you use a few damaged 2X4’s.

Don’t skimp on buying good quality hinges, latches and poultry wire. Using good quality hardware makes it much easier to keep predators like cats, dogs, racoons, skunks and such out of your poultry run and coop.

Sizing your coop to best fit your needs. Different birds have different space and roosting needs. Chickens benefit from having a roost. 12 inches of roost space per bird is recommended. Turkeys will seldom use an indoor roost. Ducks and geese are ground roosters and have no need for a indoor roost. With the exception of guineas most game birds are ground roosting birds.
Pigeons have quite different roost requirements. Please research their roost needs ‘before’ buying or trapping pigeons.

Chickens require at least 2 square feet of coop floor space. Ducks require 3 square of floor space and geese need 4 or more square feet of floor space.
A 4 foot by 8 foot 4X8=32 square feet. However you must remember some of that floor space will be occupied by roost, nest boxes, feeders and water containers. A 4×8 coop will house about 10 or maybe 12 laying hens. 8 ducks and about 4 turkeys or geese.
The outside run should be 2 or 3 times as large your coop floor space.

A coop that is 8 foot by 8 foot in size is a good size for the average backyard or tiny farmer. Healthy happy birds produce many eggs and quickly gain weight.

If you are unable to design your coop there are many University sites with fact sheets and design plans to assist you in designing and constructing you coop, outside run or fly pen.

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