Tag Archives: beets

Home Grown Salad – Seed To Fork

Lettuce is fast growing cool weather crop that quickly reaches maturity. It is a cool season plant best grown in the spring and fall of the year in most of the U.S. With so many loose leaf and head varieties your most difficult decision is which varieties to plant.

First plant the cold tolerant lettuce varieties in the cool early spring months, then sow the heat tolerant varieties in late spring to spread out your lettuce harvest as long as possible. Stage plant lettuce, planting pots and beds every 7 to 10 days.
Lettuce benefits from a rich well drained soil.
Fertilize lettuce using a nigh nitrogen based fertilizer, something like 10-5-5.

Hint Lettuce seed require exposure to sun light to germinate.
Sprinkle seeds on top of the soil, and lightly cover or scratch them into the bed just below the surface of the soil. It is helpful to cover pots and beds with clear plastic to prevent your soil from drying out before your lettuce seed germinate. For best performance, Lettuce must be kept moist, Not Wet, throughout its growing season.

Harvest Lettuce at any stage of growth, small, young plants are tender with a delicate flavor.

Some proven and reliable Lettuce varieties are listed for your consideration.

Cold-Weather Lettuce
Arctic King (green, semiheading)
Brune d’Hiver (green, semiheading)
Rouge d’Hiver (red, romaine type)
Winter Marvel (green, semiheading)

Cool-Weather Lettuce
Buttercrunch (green, semiheading)
Four Seasons (red and green, semiheading)
Lolla Rossa (red, leaf lettuce)
Royal Oakleaf (green, leaf lettuce)
Tom Thumb (green, semiheading)

Heat-Tolerant Lettuce
Black Seeded Simpson (green, leaf lettuce)
Craquerelle du Midi (green, romaine type)
Red Riding Hood (red, semiheading)
Two Star (green, leaf lettuce)

Kale is a hardy, cool season green that is part of the ‘cole’ cabbage family. It grows best in the spring and fall and can tolerate frosts. Kale is rich in minerals and vitamins A and C.

You can plant kale anytime from early spring to early summer. If you plant kale late in the summer you can harvest it from Fall until the ground freezes in Winter.

Spinach has similar growing conditions and requirements as lettuce, it is nutritious and can be eaten raw or cooked. Spinach is high in iron, calcium, vitamins and is a excellent source of vitamin A, B, and C.

Plant seeds when your soil temperature is 40%F to 75%F. Seeds may fail to germinate in warm soils. Plant seed 1/2 to 1 inch deep and 2 inch apart cover lightly with soil. After germination, thin plants 4 to 6 inches apart. Keep your seed bed damp ‘Not Wet’ to speed germination.

Swiss Chard Plant in full sun or particular shade. Chard prefers full sun early in the season, part shade in summer when it’s warm. Chars will Tolerate moderate frosts, but don’t plant in very early spring. Seed Germinates when your soil reaches 40%F to 95%F, but is best around 70%F.

Chard likes well drained moist (Not Wet) soil. It prefers deep, loose, fertile soil, high in organic matter, with pH 6.0 to 7.0. Needs consistent moisture, especially as plants grow large.
Chard will benefit from a mid season fertilization using a N-P-K of something like 10-5-5.

Beets like full sun and will handle light shade. Beets are not heavy feeders and tolerates low fertility soils. Plant beets in well drained loam to silt loam soil, high in organic matter. Beets tolerate low fertility and light frost but require consistent moisture.

Beet seed Germinates from about 40%F to 85%F but around 50%F is a good soil planting temperature. Seed will begin to emerge in 5 to 8 days. Don’t panic it may take two to three weeks in cooler soils.

Temperature, it’s all about the soil temperature.
Soil temperature is almost never to warm, however, soils that are to cool and damp at worst can cause your seed to rot in the ground and at best take many days to germinate. Seedling in cool soil grow slowly and often do not develop into healthy productive plants.

vegetable seed germination chart

herb seed germination chart

Words of wisdom: Never kick a fresh turd on a hot day. Harry S Truman

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Beet Root makes any meal special

If your a fan or maybe not of beet roots this pickled beet recipe will add a new twist to salads or as a side dish to many meals.

What you will need.
1 – can small whole beets. (well drained)
1 – pint canning jar with new lid and screw ring.
1 or 2 cloves (no more than 2)
1 whole garlic clove (optional) Do not crush. mince or slice
1/2 cup 5% acid vinegar of your choice (white, cider or wine vinegar)
1/2 cup distilled water (tap water will work)
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt

Preheat your canning jar.
Bring enough water to cover your jar to a boil and remove from the burner.
Place you jar in the water to preheat.

Canning mix.
In a small pan add vinegar, water, cloves, sugar and salt.
Bring to a boil, remove from heat an stir until salt and sugar is dissolved.

Packing you jar.
Remove your preheated jar from the pan of hot water.
Pack with small whole beets and garlic clove (if used).

When vinegar mix comes to a boil remove from heat and very carefully pour hot vinegar mix over your beets.
Leave 1/2 inch head space in your jar. (add more vinegar as required to fill canning jar)
Cap jar and tighten jar screw ring.

Allow beets to cool to room temperature.
Refrigerate for 24 to 72 hours before serving.
Pickled beets can safely be kept sealed up to 3 months. Consume within 1 month after opening jar.

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It’s Not To Late To Plant Your Fall Garden


Generally speaking, insect pest are less of a problem when planting a Fall Garden.

Meet the mustard family includes cool season crops such as Brussels sprout, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, kohlrabi, mustard, broccoli, turnips and watercress.
The close kinship of these crops enable diversified usage of plant parts. For instance, Brussels sprout plants are grown by most gardeners for a miniature heads (sprouts) which develop in the axils of the leaves. However, the leaves of Brussels sprouts are considered by some to be milder and sweeter than those of the collard which is especially grown for leaf production. Most gardeners are familiar with the fact turnips can be grown for the greens (leaves) or for the turnip roots.

This group of cole crops enjoy cool seasons and are somewhat cold tolerant. Cabbage for instance can withstand frost down to 20 degrees or even 15 degrees F. Cauliflower and chard are more sensitive to cold than broccoli, collards, kale, kohlrabi, or mustard.

When you plant cole crops in the garden you are investing in a healthful life. Gardeners are in the business of producing health foods even though they may not know it. Vegetables contain essential elements for health and the enjoyment of eating fresh garden vegetables makes health fun. Vitamin C cannot be stored in the body, making a daily supply essential to good health.

Cabbage is high in vitamin C, Broccoli, collards, and other vegetables of the cabbage family are rich in vitamin C, as are leafy vegetables such as kale and turnip greens supply carotene, which the human digestive system converts to Vitamin A.
Hint: Cole crops taste best and will not get that sulpher smell common when cooking Cole crops if you Do Not Over Cook them. They should be tender but still retain a bit of crunch in your mouth.

The edible parts of broccoli and cauliflower are the flower heads which are quite sensitive to environmental and nutritional stress. Cabbage and Brussels sprouts produce leafy heads and can withstand greater fluctuations in weather.

** Planting Dates: Using the days to harvest on your seed package, add 21 days to get your seed to harvest times.
Based on your first hard frost date, count back from frost date days from seed to harvest to get your last chance planting date.

# Example
If your first hard Frost date 15 November and your seed package days to harvest is 60 days add 21 days = 81 days.
Count backwards, Your last chance seed planting date is: 27th day of August
It is OK and even preferred to plant before that date but anytime after that date will likely result in a failed Fall garden crop.
Many Fall gardeners start planting their fall gardens starting in late June and early July.

Broccoli
Days to harvest: 50–65

Arcadia—late (fall production); small heads; domed
Early Dividend—early; reliable yields
Green Comet—early; large center heads and side shoots
Green Valiant—midseason; small firm heads
Gypsy—midseason; heat tolerant
Mariner—midseason; medium-sized compact heads
Packman—early to midseason; uniform; large heads
Premium Crop—midseason; large center heads; few side shoots

Brussels sprouts
Days to harvest: 85–110

Jade Cross—large dark green sprouts
Prince Marvel—mild tasting; small to medium sprouts

Cabbage (green)
Early-season cultivars mature approximately 50 to 60 days

after transplanting. Late season cultivars may require 100 or more days to mature.
Arrowhead—early; cone-shaped head
Blue Pak—midseason; medium to large dark blue heads
Bravo—midseason; uniform round blue-green heads
Dynamo—early; small heads; less likely to split
Gourmet—midseason; medium to large heads
Head Start—early; medium to large heads
Heads Up—early; fusarium yellows resistant
Rio Verde—late; large blue-green heads
Savoy Express—savoy type; early
Savoy King—savoy type; midseason; high yields
Stonehead—very early; small heads

Cabbage (red)
Red Acre—midseason; small round heads
Regal Red—early; medium heads
Ruby Perfection—late; small to medium dark red heads

Cauliflower
Early-season cultivars mature approximately
50 to 55 days after transplanting. Late-season cultivars mature
in 75 to 80 days. Novelty cultivars produce purple and orange heads that change color when cooked.
Candid Charm—midseason
Early Snowball—early
Fremont—early
Snow Crown—early; reliable for spring and fall
Snowball Y—midseason; solid smooth heads
White Sails—midseason

Collards
Days to harvest: 70–80

Flash—non-heading type; slow to bolt; blue-green leaves
Georgia—non-heading type; wavy blue-green leaves Morris—heading type; open pollinated
Top Bunch—deep green, slightly wavy, broad leaves
Vates—non-heading type; compact plants; smooth, dark green, thick-textured leaves; open pollinated

Kale
Days to harvest: 50–60

Blue Ridge—dark blue-green, curled leaves
Redbor—finely curled, red-purple leaves
Vates—finely curled, blue-green leaves
Winterbor—blue-green, finely curled leaves
Kohlrabi
Days to harvest: 50–60
Early Purple Vienna—early, reddish purple with
white flesh
Early White Vienna—early, greenish white with
white flesh
Grand Duke—pale green with mild white flesh

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Beets Miss Used, Under Used And Abused – New goodies

Pickled beets
Small whole beets, blanch in boiling water for 1 minute pack in jar(s), add 1 tsp mustard seed, 6 cloves, (optional 1/2 tsp sugar)cover with a mixture of 3 parts cider vinegar and 1 part water.
Store in refrigerator for 2 to 5 days before eating.
Hint Leave root and 1/4 inch of tops on beets to prevent beets ‘bleeding’ turning your vinegar/water mixture red.

Tanya Zuckerbrot MS, RD, a Registered Dietitian said: Beets are gaining popularity as a superfood.
Beet juice consumption is associated with a decrease in blood pressure, which can be an effective way to treat cardiovascular conditions.
Beets are also one of the few vegetables that contain a group of pigments known as betalains, which display potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.

Its high fiber content (each cup of beets contains 4g of fiber), beets help to prevent constipation and promote healthy bowel movements.

Raw for shaved beet salad
Slicing the (raw) beets very thinly leaves them crisp without being too hard to chew. All you need is a vegetable peeler to shave the slices of beets to your desired thickness!
Beets and goat cheese is always a winning combination. Top with drizzles of balsamic vinegar and pinches of fresh herbs.

Roast for roasted beets
The roasting process helps to concentrate the sweetness, and the caramelization of beets’ natural sugar helps add a complexity of flavors.
Wrapped in foil while roasting so that they don’t dry out. Roast in a 400 degree oven for about 1 hour and 15 minutes, peel and season with balsamic vinegar and orange zest to taste.

Blend for Beet Juice
Beet juice is actually delicious and rich in fiber. One cup of beet juice contains about 5g of fiber and half the amount of sugar as compared to one cup of fresh orange juice.
Beets pair well with almost any fruit or vegetable and add a vibrant color to juice drinks. The classic recipe consist of Apples, Beets and Carrots blended together.

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Think Green – Green Salads Is On The Menu

Soil temperatures are creeping up. Many places soils are at or near 60 degrees. That is your signal to plant your salad garden.

leaf lettuce

leaf lettuce

Source University of Illinois Extension Lettuce is a cool weather vegetable that thrives when the average daily temperature is between 60 and 70°F. Plant in early spring. Many gardeners will need to select types and varieties of lettuce that withstand heat. Some are much more heat tolerant than other varieties.

Leaf lettuce, the most widely adapted of all the Lettuce types, produces crisp leaves loosely arranged on the stalk. Romaine types form a upright, elongated head. Butterhead varieties are generally small, loose heading types that have tender, soft leaves with a delicate flavor.

Green Leaf
Black-seeded Simpson (early to harvest)
Grand Rapids (frilly edges; good for coldframes, greenhouse, garden)
Oak Leaf (resistant to tipburn; good for hot weather)
Red Leaf
Red Fire (ruffles with red edge – slow to bolt)
Red Sails (slowest bolting red leaf lettuce)
Ruby (darkest red of all – resistant to tipburn)
Romaine
Cimmaron (unique, dark red leaf)
Green Towers (early – dark green, large leaves)
Paris Island (long – standing)

Leaf lettuce may be cut whenever it is large enough to use. Cutting every other plant at ground level gives the remaining plants more space. Leaf lettuce reaches maximum size (6 to 12 ounces) in 50 to 60 days. Butterhead varieties form small, loose heads that weigh 4 to 8 ounces at harvest (60 to 70 days).

Harvesting and Storage Harvest leaf varaties at any size. Store lettuce, wash, drip dry and place in a plastic bag in the refrigerator.

Plant your lettuce carefully following the seed package instructions.
* What went wrong? Failure of seeds to germinate is almost always caused by insufficient moisture. Take extra care to keep the seedbed moist, but not soggy, until the seedlings emerge.

growing-swiss-chard Planting Swiss Chard
Plant chard seeds 2 to 3 weeks before the last spring frost date. Before planting, mix 1 cup of 5-10-10 fertilizer into the soil for every 20 feet of row.
Water the plants evenly, water often during dry spells.

Harvest/Storage of Swiss Chard Start harvesting when the plants are 6 to 8 inches tall. Cut off the outer leaves 1-1/2 inches above the ground.
The leaves can be eaten fresh(raw) as greens or you can cook them like spinach.
Store chard in the refrigerator in ventilated plastic bags.

Swiss chard is not only one of the most popular vegetables along the Mediterranean but it is one of the most nutritious vegetables around and ranks second only to spinach following our analysis of the total nutrients.

Beet and turnip greens should be considered. Adding fresh, young, tender, flavorful beet and turnip greens to your salads adds another level of flavor and texture to your salads.

Another – Mediterranean style dressing.
1 medium clove Chopped Garlic
1 table spoon fresh lemon or lime juice
3 table spoons extra virgin olive oil
salt and black pepper to taste
Optional:
6 or more kalamata (packed in oil) olives
1/2 cup feta cheese
1 tea spoon soy sauce
1 tea spoon dry oregano

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Carrots, Parsnips, Radishes, Turnips, And Rutabagas

Carrots, parsnips, radishes, turnips, and rutabagas all have similar cultural requirements and grow in cool weather. Since they are hardy, they may be planted early in the spring, and left in the garden until fall. In addition, tops of beets and turnips are commonly used as cooked greens and can be harvested while the plants are young.

Root crops like to be grown in full sun but most will tolerate light afternoon share.
Seed Germination temperature is 50F to 85F. Most will germinate at temperatures as low a 40F. They will germinate in about a week at 75F.

Soil preparation is very important in achieving success with the root crops. They grow best in a deep, rock free, loose well drained soil that retains moisture.
Root crops do not grow well in very acid soils.
Nitrogen recommendations for beets, carrots, parsnips, and rutabagas are about 3/4 to 1 cup of urea/100 sq. ft. Apply half during seed bed preparation and sidedress the other half in mid-season.
Radishes and turnips, nitrogen recommendations are about 1/2 cup urea/100 sq. ft. to be broadcast and incorporated before planting.
You can improve your soil by adding well rotted manure or compost. Do not use fresh manure as it can stimulate branching of the roots, compromising the quality of the crop and may increase weed problems.
Till the soil deeply, then smooth the surface in order to prepare a good seedbed.

Plant radishes and turnips beginning about April 15 for a spring crop, and again August 1 for a fall crop.
Start planting carrots and beets beginning April 15.
Plant parsnips beginning May 1.
For a continuous supply of young carrots, make two or three plantings spaced two or three weeks apart.
Rutabagas require a long growing season and should be planted May 15 for a fall crop.

Carrots, parsnips, radishes, and turnips should be thinned to 2-3 inch spacing. Rutabagas should be thinned to a 8 inch spacing.

Root crops need at least 1 inch of water from rainfall or irrigation each week during the growing season. Always soak the soil thoroughly when watering. Your soil should remain ‘damp’ not wet.

Grow Carrots in containers
University of Minnesota
Cornell university
University of Illinois
Utah state university

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Beets – Root vegetable Everyone Loves To Hate

Beets are Easy to grow and do double duty in the kitchen, producing tasty roots for baking, boiling or sautéing and fresh greens to boil, steam or eat raw in salads.
Plant them early for top quality and best flavor. (Fluctuating weather can reduce quality and create white zone rings in the roots.) Some varieties have red stems and venation in the leaves, making them a natural for edible landscaping.

Beets like full sun but will tolerate light shade. Beets will tolerate low fertility but prefers well drained sandy loam to silt loam soil, high in organic matter, with pH between 6.5 and 7 and free of large rocks.
Good soil structure is important because growth is improved by good soil aeration.
Beets grow poorly in acid soils.
They require consistent moisture. Do not plant in soils with pH less than 6.0.
Beets use boron inefficiently. Boron is less available in soils with high pH and high organic matter. Corky black areas in the roots indicate boron deficiency.

Plant beet seed when soil temperature is 50F(10C) to 85F(29C) However beets will still germinate at temperatures as low as 40F(5C)and as high as 90F(32C).
Days to germinate is 5 to 8 days. It may take two to three weeks in colder soils.

Plant in early spring, as soon as you can work the soil, plant 3/4 inch deep and 3 inches apart in rows 12 to 18 inches apart. For continuous harvest, make successive plantings every 10-14 days until midsummer. For winter crops, sow seed about 10 weeks before your first hard freeze.

Hint: The wrinkled “seedball” usually contains two to four viable seeds, making it necessary to thin plants to 3 to 4 inch spacing if you plan to harvest young, small roots, or 6 inch spacings for larger roots for winter storage.
Begin thinning when seedlings are about 4 to 5 inches tall, and eat the thinnings. Cut rather than pull plants when thinning to avoid disturbing roots of other plants.

Some “monogerm” beet varieties have only one seed per fruit also some seed companies remove seeds from the seedball.
Unlike most root crops, beets can be started inside or in cold frames and transplanted into the garden.
Use floating row covers to discourage insects.
Keep well weeded. Competition and uneven watering can make beets stringy and tough.
Hint: Too much nitrogen will encourage top growth. That’s a good thing if you mainly want beet greens. However high nitrogen retards root development.

Beets are biennials. Normally, they produce an enlarged root during their first season. Then after overwintering they produce a flower stalk. If they experience two to three weeks of temperatures below 45 F after they have formed true leaves they may bolt and develop a flower stalk prematurely.
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Ohio state university
Cornell university
Clemson university
Utah state university

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Fall Vegetables – A Healthy Feast

Pumpkin low in calories, a powerhouse of antioxidant vitamins, A, C and E. It contains trace minerals copper, calcium, potassium and phosphorus, and poly-phenolic antioxidants including lutein, xanthin, and carotenes.
Good for heart health. Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of dietary fiber and mono-unsaturated fatty acids.
Hint: Vitamin A is essential for healthy skin and vision, and it is known to be helpful in fighting certain cancers.

Butternut Squash a winter type squash is packed with poly-phenolic anti-oxidants and vitamins. Rich source of dietary fiber, potassium, phytonutrients, and vitamins A and C.
Hint: Baking brings out its mellow flavor. Adding cinnamon gives it a touch of sweetness.

Beets are delicious and now is it’s peak season. If you’ve only had dark red ones try gold and white beets. They provides 5 percent of the vitamin C you need as well as vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6 and pantothenic acid.
Hint: Boiling beets brings out their mild flavor. Roasting caramelizes their natural sugar for a slightly sweet and crispy treat.

Pomegranate is as chocked full of antioxidants. Tangy and slightly sour it is an excellent source of Vitamin C and folate.
Hint: Use pomegranates in recipes as a replacement to cranberries.
Read more

Country life is a good life.

Happy Fall gardening

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Where Have All The Hummingbirds Gone?

About 10 days ago I made a batch of sugar water(1 cup sugar, 4 cups water) and hung my Hummingbird feeders. Before dark I had 2 pair of Ruby Throat Hummingbirds finding and feeding from my new feeders.

Then the next day I had the start of a few days of overcast, cooler weather. Hummingbirds must have gone back to Mexico, They because they are no longed feeding at my new feeders! However I do have 4 or 5 pair of Eurasian Doves coming twice a day to feed, a few Red Wing Black birds and a pair of Red birds.

It’s almost mid-week and the sun is shining, temperature is bumping 80 degrees, but the west wind is holding steady at 30 mph gusting to 35 or 40 mph. Not really a nice day to garden.

On the brighter side, many of the onion sets I planted in my patio pots are shooting bright green shoots skyward. A few Radish seeds and Beet seed have germinated and are showing the promise of making a fresh spring time salad. Fresh green onions, radish and beets. It doesn’t get much better than that.

Pear, Apple, Cherry, Peach and Apricot trees are in full bloom every where you look. Mesquite trees are setting bugs. Mesquite trees seldom get fooled and get hit with a late freeze. So, taking my lead from my old Mesquite tree. Today sweet corn will be planted. Early planted corn has a better chance of avoiding being attack by ear and root worms.

The wheat and cereal rye seed son-n-law drilled (8 acres) in late last fall is up and providing good grazing for our livestock. I had almost decided that we had not received enough rain for get a crop up. But I think that slow melting be had in late January did the trick.

I’m off like a shot in the dark. Corn seed in hand.

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Greens And Frogs – Good For You And Your Table

frog kiss Just Kidding About The Frogs!

Chard, Spinach, Turnips, Beets and many more vegetables are grown for their delicious green tops. Most greens are best grown in the cool weather of early Spring and planted in mid/late summer for the cool Fall weather. Lucky for us, some of the green top producing crops like kale will tolerate frost and even freezing weather.

Kale The ‘New’ Super Vegetable Kale is a hardy, cool season green that is part of the ‘cole’ cabbage family. It grows best in the spring and fall and can tolerate frosts. Kale is rich in minerals and vitamins A and C.

You can plant kale anytime from early spring to early summer. If you plant kale late in the summer you can harvest it from Fall until the ground freezes in Winter.
Mix 1-1/2 cups of N-P-K, 5-10-10 fertilizer per 25 feet of row into the top 3 to 4 inches of soil. Plant the seeds 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep.
Kale likes well drained, light soil. After about 2 weeks, thin the seedlings so that they are spaced 8 to 12 inches apart.

Spinach has similar growing conditions and requirements as lettuce, it is nutritious and can be eaten raw or cooked. Spinach is high in iron, calcium, vitamins and is a excellent source of vitamin A, B, and C. Cornell University – Growing Spinach

Plant seeds when your soil temperature is 40%F to 75%F. Hint Seeds may fail to germinate in warm soils. Plant seed 1/2 to 1 inch deep and 2 inch apart cover lightly with soil. After germination, thin plants 4 to 6 inches apart. Keep your seed bed damp ‘Not Wet’ to speed germination.

Spinach likes a rich soil with compost capable of retaining moisture. It may be beneficial to side dress your crop with a N-P-K 10-5-5 when your Spinach is about 3 week old.

Swiss Chard (aka) stem chard, spinach beet, leaf beet. Cornell University Growing Chard
Plant in full sun or particular shade. Chard prefers full sun early in the season, part shade in summer when it’s warm. Chars will Tolerate moderate frosts, but don’t plant in very early spring. Seed Germinates when your soil reaches 40%F to 95%F, but is best around 70%F.

Chard likes well drained moist (Not Wet) soil. It prefers deep, loose, fertile soil, high in organic matter, with pH 6.0 to 7.0. Needs consistent moisture, especially as plants grow large.

Chard will benefit from a mid season fertilization using a N-P-K of something like 10-5-5.

Chard Varities for your consideration.

Beets and their delicious tops. Beets like full sun and will handle light shade. Beets are not heavy feeders and tolerates low fertility soils. Plant beets in well drained loam to silt loam soil, high in organic matter, with pH between 6.5 and 7. Good soil structure is important because growth is improved by good soil aeration. Beets tolerate low fertility and light frost but require consistent moisture.

Beet seed Germinates from about 40%F to 85%F but around 50%Fis a good soil planting temperature. Seed will begin to emerge in 5 to 8 days. Don’t panic it may take two to three weeks in cooler soils.
Hint Seed can be saved 4 years.

Here is a list of a few beet varieties for your consideration.

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