Dry and windy start – 2018 garden

Weather wise 2018 is not starting off well for those of us that chose to live in the southwest corner of Oklahoma.
January I logged a total of 0.08 inches of rain and during the past 3 months, November 2017 – January 2018 my tiny garden has been blessed with 0.66 inches of rain. The National Weather Service classifies my area as being in a severe drought.

It’s still 70+ day until I will see my last freeze/frost and begin spring planting. That doesn’t stop me from planning my new wildflower and vegetable garden.

As with all real estate, planning a garden will be much involved about location, location, location.
Selection and preparation of the garden site is an important key to growing a home garden successfully.
An area exposed to full or near full sunlight with deep, well-drained, fertile soil is ideal. The site should also be located near a water supply and, if possible, away from trees and shrubs that will compete with the garden for light, water, and nutrients.
While these conditions are ideal, many gardeners have a small area with a less than optimal site on which to grow vegetables.
Yet, it is still possible to grow a vegetable garden by modifying certain cultural practices and types of crops grown.
Areas with light or thin shade can be used, such as those under young trees, under mature trees with high lacy canopies, or in bright, airy places which receive only one to two hours of direct sun per day. There are several vegetables which will grow under these conditions, including beans, beets, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, chard, kohlrabi, leaf lettuce, peas, potatoes, radishes, rhubarb, spinach, and turnips.
Unfortunately, few vegetables will grow well under full, dense shade.
If the site is not well drained or if the soil is thin, the use of raised beds can help with this problem.

In order to have a successful garden, the gardener must follow a few rules. The following tips may help to prevent some common garden problems from occurring, or help overcome those that do arise:
Sample soil and have it tested every three to four years.
Apply fertilizers in the recommended manner and amount.
Make use of organic materials such as compost when and where available.
Use recommended plant varieties for your area.
Thin plants when small.
Use mulches to conserve moisture, control weeds, and reduce fruit rots.
Avoid excessive walking and working in the garden when foliage and soil are wet.
Examine the garden often to keep ahead of potential weeds, insect, and disease problems.
Wash and clean tools and sprayers after each use.
Rotate specific crop family locations each year to avoid insect and disease buildup.
When possible, harvest vegetables during the cool hours of the day.

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6 responses to “Dry and windy start – 2018 garden

  1. Beside avoiding insect and disease buildup, crop rotation gives various nutrients to the soil and can also improve soil structure and fertility by alternating deep-rooted and shallow-rooted plants

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Here in Wales we have had so much rain – including last night – with severe winds and some frost and even snow – the garden is waterlogged! Choose which you prefer – smile!

    Liked by 1 person

    • One time many years past after many wet rainy days I commented to a farmer if he had all the rain he needed, he grinned and said “I’d rather have mud on my boots than blowing sand in my eyes.”
      Happy gardening and hope you soon dry out enough to have a successful spring garden.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Sorry to hear you’re so dry…. again 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    • Grin … Thank you, but we learn how, when and what to plant to survive our wet and dry seasons. How to collect water and how to best use water to spare our pocketbook from buying tap water except in real emergencies to prevent trees and vines from suffering extreme water stress.
      Happy soon to be Spring Gardening

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks for the good tips.

    Liked by 1 person

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