Horseradish – Easy to grow

Horseradish is a easy to grow root crop of the crucifer family which has an oil that contains the sulfur compound allyl isothyocyanate. This compound imparts the strong pungent odor and hot, biting flavor to the root.
The roots are carrot like in shape, usually rough and white to cream in color. The plant may grow to a height of three feet.
Caution Leaves have no culinary value and contain a slightly poisonous compound.

Horseradish plants will grow well in usda zones 4 to 8 in fertile, well drained soils. They are propagated by planting pieces of side roots that are taken from the main root. The roots are planted in late winter or early spring. Horseradish is difficult to eradicate once it is established. New plants regenerate from root bits left in the soil. Horseradish is harvested in late fall in most areas.
Mulch deeply to help retain soil moisture and control weeds.

Look for roots that are free of blemishes and bruises and that are creamy white in color. The roots should be fairly turgid and firm. Horseradish is best if utilized shortly after harvesting.

Horseradish goes well with most beef dishes.
** Try this sandwich spread on your next BBQ beef sandwich for your new favorite spread.
This is a simple basic quick easy to make horseradish sauce that will keep a week or more refrigerated in an airtight container.

1 cup sour cream or (Optionally use Mayonnaise)
1/4 cup grated fresh horseradish
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
* Optional 1 clove grated garlic
* Optional 1 tsp grated lemon rind
* Optional pinch of red pepper flakes
* Optional garnish with chopped chives

Not from the U.S.A. Leave a comment telling me about your hometown and country

If you see or read something you like Please Share By Re-blogging, Twitter or Email To A Friend.

Why is common sense so uncommon?
Don’t be Shy. Leave me your comment(s)

Advertisements

9 responses to “Horseradish – Easy to grow

  1. HEY I was wondering if you would be willing to do an interview with me on the Organic Gardener Podcast? The first thing on our list of garden goals for 2018 was do something with our horseradish … want to give me some tips?

    Here’s the link to our website: http://organicgardenerpodcast.com

    This week we broke 410,000 total downloads and 1500 average per individual episode and are growing strong!

    We have listeners from all around the world with strong audiences in California, Texas, Colorado, Florida, New York, Canada and Australia.

    Thanks for the consideration!

    Jackie:~)

    Mike and Jackie Beyer The Organic Gardener Podcast

    Like

  2. I learned the hard way if you heat it all the piquant disappears. So you can’t can it by any traditional method.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ve found that it grows well, but it’s always wormy by the time I want to harvest it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Grin … not to worry, after it’s ground and mixed no one can see or taste a few worms.
      Happy Holidays

      Liked by 1 person

    • This is the only insect that I can find that feeds on horseradish roots.
      **Walters, S.A. (2009) Horseradish research review. Proc. Horseradish Growers School (29 Jan. 2009), Horseradish pest survey: 2008, ed Wahle E.A. (Univ. Illinois Ext, Edwardsville), pp 43–44. **
      The imported crucifer weevil (Baris lepidii) is also an important pest of horseradish as it directly feeds on roots and can severely reduce marketable yields; however, it is rarely found above economically damaging population densities. Permethrin (Pounce; FMC) is the insecticide of choice for insect control by many horseradish growers as it has efficacy on most of the problematic insects of horseradish.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s