Ginger – Easy to grow

Ginger is grown for its aromatic, pungent, and spicy rhizomes, which are often referred to as ginger roots.

Active components in ginger are gingerols, which are responsible for its distinct fragrance and flavor.
Gingerols are powerful anti-inflammatory compounds that can help alleviate the pain caused by arthritis.
Studies have also shown that ginger helps boost the immune system, protect against colorectal cancer, and induce cell death in ovarian cancer.

Depending on the variety, the flesh may be yellow, white, or red. The skin is cream-colored to light brown and may be thick or thin, depending on the plant’s maturity at harvest.

Ginger thrives best in warm, humid climates. Choose a site that provides plenty of light, including 2 to 5 hours of direct sunlight. Ideal spots are also protected from strong winds.

The best soil for ginger is loose, loamy, and rich in organic matter. Loamy soils allow water to drain freely, which will help prevent the rhizomes from becoming waterlogged. Thick mulch can also provide nutrients, retain water, and help control weeds.

Before planting, cut the ginger rhizome into 1- to 1½-inch pieces, and set them aside for a few days to allow the cut surface area to heal and form a callus. In early spring, plant ginger rhizomes. Each piece should be plump with well developed growth buds, or eyes.
Note: If you are buying ginger from a store, soak the rhizomes in water overnight because they are sometimes treated with a growth retardant.

Plant the rhizomes 6 to 8 inches apart, 2 to 4 inches deep with the growth buds pointing upward. They can be planted whole or in smaller pieces with a couple of growing buds. Ginger plants will grow to about 2 to 3 feet tall.

Add a slow release organic fertilizer at planting. Afterward, liquid fertilizer may be applied every few weeks.

Soil amendments are especially needed in regions of heavy rainfall, where rain can leach essential nutrients from the soil. You can also add compost, which will supply nutrients as well as retain water in the soil. Ginger roots benefit from fertilizer containing high levels of phosphorus (P), something like NPK 5-20-5.

Do not allow the plants to dry out while they are actively growing. As the weather cools, reduce watering. This will encourage the plants to form underground rhizomes. In dry areas, mist or spray plants regularly. Avoid overwatering.

Ginger is typically available in two forms:
Young ginger is usually available only in Asian markets and does not need to be peeled.
Mature ginger is more readily available and has a tough skin that needs to be peeled.

Ginger is a good source of copper, magnesium, manganese, potassium, and vitamin B6. Historically, it has been used to relieve symptoms of gastrointestinal distress.

The level of flavor that ginger delivers to a meal depends on when it is added during the cooking process. Added early, it will give a hint of flavor; adding it toward the end will bring about a more pungent taste.

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12 responses to “Ginger – Easy to grow

  1. Trying this in South Florida, Happy Holidays!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. We use a lot of ginger in cooking here but the climate is against us when it comes to growing it outside so we plant the cut pieces in buckets and place them in our porch, it is case of remembering to water them most days to keep the the soil damp. It is easy to grow and harvest. Informative article, thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I use ginger root a lot in my daily cooking and have always wanted to try growing it. Our climate is probably not the best for ginger, but I wonder if putting a little plastic frame over the plants would do the trick Any thoughts?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m going to give it a shot, thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ginger is great for helping with anti sickness it was a firm favourite in the cancer day unit I went to. I had ovarian cancer, so had no idea it was actually helping with this too – I used it for the chemo mouth and antisickness. Chemo mouth happens about two to three days after the session where all you can taste is chemo/rubber/copper/metal no matter what you eat. It’s a constant taste it’s indescribable, it’s disgusting. The only things that gave relief for a few minutes were ginger, liquorice, onions and sometimes pineapples. As I was having weekly chemo sessions chemo mouth never went away until treatment stopped.

    Could I grow ginger in my greenhouse? We have humidity but we have strong winds so maybe I could protect the plant this way under glass?

    Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

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