Artichoke – For Your Dinning Table And Your Landscape

artichoke Artichoke, not just for the rich and famous. By many artichoke is considered a luxury food Only eaten by the rich and famous and those living along the Mediterranean Sea.

Artichoke is a cool season perennial prized for its flavorful “hearts” and is hardy to Zone 9 to 6 if well mulched, and occasionally Zone 5 during mild winters. Its bristly leaves and violet (purple) flowers add a unique color and texture to flower gardens.
Artichoke prefers deep, fertile, well drained soil that is high in organic matter with a pH between 6.5 and 8.0. It is a heavy feeder that requires lots of moisture for maximum growth. It can survive drought conditions however does not produce well.

Artichocks Are Not easy to grow. They 3 to 6 feet tall, spreading 2 to 4 feet wide.
They don’t bloom until mid fall. Their violet flower resembles thistle flowers. Flowering stalks with flowers are globe shaped(round).
Gardeners harvest and eat flower head and bracts before they open.

Planting seed, requires a soil temperature of 70F to 80F to germinate. Seed germinates in 7 to 14 days.

Planting from seed not recommended because results are highly variable. If you do, start seeds indoors about 8 to 12 weeks before last frost. Harden off in cold frame. Cold treatment of starts (keeping temperature between 35 F and 50 F for about 10 days) can induce flowering in first year plants. Transplant outside after soil has reached 60 F.

Artichokes benefit from the use of a low nitrogen fertilizer (high in phosphorus and potassium), which can be incorporated before planting.
Artichokes usually don’t flower the first year.
To increase chance of overwintering, head back to 12 inches tall and cover with leaves or cover with baskets or boxes, and heap more leaves over the top of the basket.
Another alternative is to dig roots and store in a cold (but not freezing) room. Pot up about a month before transplanting out after last frost.
Hint: Individual plants may live up to 15 years or more, divide about every 3 years to keep your plants productive.

Shorter season varieties that are more likely to flower and over winter include:

Imperial Star – grows just 3 feet tall.
Violetto – purplish buds.
Grande Buerre – spineless heads, grows up to 9 feet tall.

Green Globe
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(3.2 Stars) Overall Average 3.25
4 Reviews
Days to Maturity:
NA
  Standard variety with sharp spines gently reduced and larger, heavier, consistent-quality, globe shaped heads. Also known as Vert Globe.
Violetto
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(3.0 Stars) Overall Average 3
1 Review
Days to Maturity:
85
  Purple Italian artichoke. Hardier than ‘Green Globe’. Plants produce deep purple sepals and smallish, oval, slightly elongated chokes. Also known as ‘Violetta’.
Emerald
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(3.0 Stars) Overall Average 3
1 Review
Days to Maturity:
180 – 360
  Hybrid. Plants up to 5 feet tall bear large, globe-shaped, thornless, glossy heads over long harvest period. Tolerates both hot and cold conditions better than most artichoke varieties.
Imperial Star
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(2.8 Stars) Overall Average 2.8
6 Reviews
Days to Maturity:
80 – 120
  Grows 3- to 4-feet tall and bears 3 to 8, 4-inch-diameter buds. Can tolerate light but not hard frost.
Peto
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(0.0 Stars)
0 Reviews
Days to Maturity:
98
  Dark green. Use for main crop. Yellows tolerant. Maturity 98 days from transplant.
Purple Romagna
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(0.0 Stars)
0 Reviews
Days to Maturity:
NA
  Italian heirloom. Plants produce large, round, purple flowerheads. Also known as ‘Purple of Romagna’.
Green Globe Improved
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(0.0 Stars)
0 Reviews
Days to Maturity:
NA
  Similar to ‘Green Globe’ but plants are shorter, more productive and bear higher percentage marketable chokes.
Grosso Romanesco
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(0.0 Stars)
0 Reviews
Days to Maturity:
100
  Plants with rich purple color produce large, round chokes. Also known as ‘Big Romanesco’.
Northern Star
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(0.0 Stars)
0 Reviews
Days to Maturity:
300
  Hardy ‘Green Globe’ type artichoke bred to overwinter for spring harvest northern locations. Planted in May or June, it is said to withstand subzero temperatures for harvest the following April through June, but your mileage may vary.
Purple Italian Globe
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(0.0 Stars)
0 Reviews
Days to Maturity:
120
  Open pollinated variety from Italy. Plants produce large, tender heads and are more tolerant to both heat and cold than standard green globe.
Gros Vert de Laon
Artichoke – Globe
Overall Rating:
(0.0 Stars)
0 Reviews
Days to Maturity:
NA
  Mid- to late-season French variety. Silvery-leaved, 3-foot-tall plants produce large-hearted chokes.

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11 responses to “Artichoke – For Your Dinning Table And Your Landscape

  1. Grin…. just because I’m not very successful at growing Artichokes does not mean that you can’t be a whiz bang successful grower.
    Happy Gardening

    Like

  2. By far one of my favourite vegetables. I grow my own, unless the neighboring farmer sprays his thistles from an airplane; in which my artichokes die!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Love artichokes. The purple ones looks stunning. And even if you don’t like to eat them they make a great landscape plant.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: CAN YOU HELP ME FIND THIS? | helbergfarmstories

  5. The first plants we had took a year before they produced, but they were well worth the work. We had to move and leave them behind. I plan to plant more so thank you for this information. Last time we just guessed.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I saw artichokes growing recently. I came across the most beautiful thistle like flower and from the look of the plant I made a guess it was an artichoke. Then here I see your blog and Discover I was correct in my wild assumption. Heavens, they sound a bit tricky, I’d love a garden full of those gorgeous flowers but I’m not sure I’m brave enough to tackle these little gems.

    Liked by 1 person

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