Freezing Homegrown Tomato’s Is Easy

Freezing Raw Tomatoes (with or without their skins).

Frozen tomatoes are best used in cooked dishes such as soups, sauces and stews. Tomatoes become mushy when they’re thawed for use.

To quickly freeze raw tomatoes without blanching them first.Tomatoes may be frozen whole, sliced, chopped, or puréed.
Tomatoes should be seasoned just before serving not ate the time they are prepared for freezing. Freezing may strengthen or weaken seasonings flavors such as garlic, onion, and herbs.

Washing tomatoes, wet each tomato with water, rub its surface, rinse it with running water, and dry it with a paper towel. After washing, cut away the stem scar and surrounding area and discard it before slicing or chopping the tomato.

Washing tomatoes in a sink filled with water is not recommended since contaminated water can be absorbed through the fruit’s stem scar. The use of soap or detergent is not recommended for washing fruits and vegetables because they can absorb detergent residues.

Dry them well by blotting with a clean cloth or paper towels.

Freezing whole tomatoes with peels on: Wash and clean tomatoes as described above.
Cut away the stem scar. Place the tomatoes on cookie sheets and freeze.
Note Tomatos may be placed directly in bags and frozen. Limit the number of tomato’s in each bag to the number anticipated for 1 meal or dish.

Tomatoes do not need to be blanched before freezing. Once frozen, transfer the tomatoes from the cookie sheets into freezer bags or other containers. Seal tightly.
Using frozen tomatoes, remove them from the freezer a few at a time or all at once. To peel, just run a frozen tomato under warm/hot tap water in the kitchen sink. Its skin will slip off easily.

Freezing peeled tomatoes: If you prefer to freeze peeled tomatoes, you can wash the tomatoes and then dip them in boiling water for about 1 minute or until the skins split. Peel and then freeze as described above.

Source Freezing Raw Tomatoes (with or without their skins)

Source Freezing Tomatoes – National Center for Home Food Preservation

Approximate Yields for Canned or Frozen Fruits & Vegetables
Raw Products Measure & Weight Approximate Quart Jars or Containers Needed Approximate Pounds Needed for 1 Quart Jar or Container
Fruits
Apples 1 bushel (48 pounds) 16 to 20 2½ to 3
Apples (for sauce) 1 bushel (48 pounds) 15 to 18 2½ to 3½
Apricots 1 lug (24 pounds) 9 to 12 2 to 2½
Berries (except strawberries & cranberries) 24-quart crate (36 pounds) 12 to 18 1½ to 3 (1- to 2-quart boxes)
Cantaloupes 1 crate (60 pounds)   1 large melon
Cherries
(with stems)
1 bushel (56 pounds) 22 to 32 (unpitted) 2 to 2½
1 lug (box) (15 pounds) 6 to 7 (unpitted) 2 to 2½
Cranberries 1 bushel (100 pounds) 100 1
1 box (25 pounds) 25 1
Figs 1 box (6 pounds) 2 to 3 2 to 2½
Grapes 1 bushel (48 pounds) 10 to 12 4
Grapes, Western 1 lug (28 pounds) 7 to 8 4
Grapes, Eastern 12 – quart basket (18 pounds) 3 to 4 4
4 – quart basket (6 pounds) 1 4
Grapefruit
Florida, Texas &
California
1 bag or ½ box (40 pounds) 5 to 8 4 to 6 fruits
1 box (65 pounds) 8 to 13 4 to 6 fruits
Nectarines Flat (18 pounds) 6 to 9 2 to 3
Peaches 1 bushel (50 pounds) 19 to 25 2 to 2½
Pears 1 bushel (50 pounds) 20 to 25 2 to 2½
1 box (46 pounds) 19 to 23 2 to 2½
1 crate (22 pounds) 8 to 11 2 to 2½
Pineapple (with top) 1 crate (70 pounds) 20 to 28 2½  (2 average)
Plums 1 crate (70 puunds) 28 to 35 2 to 2½
1 bushel (56 pounds) 24 to 30 2 to 2½
Rhubarb 15 pounds 7 to 11 2
Strawberries 24-quart crate (36 pounds) 12 to 16 6 to 8 cups
1 crate (60 pounds) 17 to 23 2½ to 3½
1 lug (32 pounds) 9 to 12 2½ to 3½
Tomatoes (for juice) 1 bushel (53 pounds) 12 to 16 3 to 3½
1 crate (60 pounds) 17 to 20 3 to 3½
1 lug (32 pounds) 8 to 10 3 to 3½
Vegetables
Asparagus 1 bushel (24 pounds) 8 to 12 2 to 3
1 crate (30 pounds) 10 to 15 2 to 3
Beans, lima
(in pods)
1 bushel (30 pounds) 5 to 8 4 to 5
Beans, green or wax 1 bushel (30 pounds) 15 to 20 1½ to 2
Beets (without tops) 1 bushel (52 pounds) 17 to 20 2½ to 3
Broccoli 1 crate (25 pounds) 10 to 12 2 to 3
Brussels Sprouts 4 quarts 1 to 1½ 2
Cabbage 1 bag or 1 crate (50 pounds) 16 to 20> 2½ to 3
Cabbage, Western 1 crate (80 pounds) 26 to 32 2½ to 3
Carrots
(without tops)
1 bushel (50 pounds) 16 to 20 2½ to 3
Cauliflower 1½-bushel crate (37 pounds) 12 to 18 2 medium heads
Corn, Sweet
(in husks)
1 bushel (35 pounds) 8 to 9 (as kernels) 4 to 5
Cucumbers 1 bushel (48 pounds) 24 to 30 1½ to 2
Eggplant 1 bushel (33 pounds)> 15 to 18 2 average
Greens 1 bushel (18 pounds) 8 to 9 2 to 3
Okra 1 bushel (30 pounds) 19 to 21
Peas, Field 1 bushel (25 pounds) 6 to 7 3½ to 4

Peas, Green
(in pods)

1 bushel (30 pounds) 6 to 8 4 to 5
Peppers 1 bushel (25 pounds) 17 to 21 1¹⁄3
Potatoes, Irish 1 bushel (60 pounds) 18 to 22 2½ to 3
Pumpkin     1½ to 3
Spinach 1 bushel (20 pounds) 4 to 9 2 to 6
Squash (Summer) 1 bushel (40 pounds) 16 to 20 2 to 3
Squash (Winter)     3
Sweet Potatoes (cured) 1 bushel (50 pounds) 16 to 25 2 to 3

Country life is a good life.

Happy Fall gardening

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9 responses to “Freezing Homegrown Tomato’s Is Easy

  1. Interesting! I’ve never heard of freezing tomatoes, but think I’ll give it a try!

    Like

  2. Fascinating. Will give this a go. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. We have frozen tomatoes a couple of times. This occured when we were going away for a few days during the middle of canning season. Friends came by, picked and froze what would have gone by before we returned home. Then, when we returned, we defrosted them for canning. While this presented an extra-step, it was better than tossing a lot of smooshy tomatoes to get to the ready-to-can ones after returning home.
    Oscar

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Just learned something new and I am totally embarrassed…. I just assumed that a bushel was a measurement of weight not volume… my husband is currently laughing at me… Oh well.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’ve been freezing tomatoes like this for a long time and it works like a charm. So convenient to throw them into a dish later on when there are no fresh tomatoes in the garden.

    Liked by 1 person

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