Back Yard Chicken Coop – My first WordPress post – 6 years and counting

chicken coop It seems that June 2009 was my first WordPress blog posting. Not a lot has changed except chicken feed and building materials has gone up at least 25 percent.
This posting has been heavily edited and updated to the best of my knowledge and abilities.

It is getting late in the year to start your new poultry flock. However it is a good time to make plans and to start constructing your coop(hen house) and to design an outside run.
Outside space(run) needs to be a minimum of 4 square feet for each hen, ‘Larger is always better for your chickens health and welfare. {Run length X width = run size in square feet.}

Need a chicken coop? Think small, cheap and easy to build. Best rule of thumb is you will need a minimum of 2 square feet of floor space for each chicken. A four(4) foot square chicken coop will house 6 to 8 chickens with ease. If your lucky you can find enough materials free of charge to build a 4 by 4 foot or maybe as large as 4 by 8 foot (1 sheet of plywood) coop. Check with your friends and neighbors, ask around at construction sites for free ‘scrap lumber.

Home made chicken coop

Home made chicken coop

Salvage and recycle old wood fencing. It seems that someone is always replacing wood fence panels and has a need to dispose of the old panels. Wood fence panels are about 8 feet long and 6 feet tall containing two or three 8 foot long 2X4’s. If your willing to invest a little time and effort this project will cost almost no out of pocket cash to build.
Tools needed are few. A measuring tape, claw hammer, hand saw or power circle saw and a pound or 2 of 8 and 16 penny nails. Enlist the help of friends and neighbors, make it a fun to do project.

Portable chicken coop

Portable chicken coop

If your yard does not have shaded area(s) this coop is enclosed on 3 sides at the bottom, 18 to 24 inches off the ground to provide a shaded area for your chickens during the heat of summer. Without shade in high heat chickens can overheat and die. Keep in mind that it’s construction must provide you with easy access to gather eggs and to clean out old litter as needed. The picture is labeled as ‘portable coop’ but in all truth, it would not be easy to move this coop around without a lot of help.
A solid built coop is very important in keeping your flock safe from bad weather and predators. People are not the only animal that likes chicks, chicken and eggs!

Consider recycling an old unused garage or storage shed into a coop. I often see cheap made, light weight storage sheds being given away by people simply to get them out of their yard. They are light weight and would make excellent chicken coops with the addition of a few ground anchors, nest boxes and a roosting perch.

Simple chicken coop design

Simple chicken coop design

This picture is of poor quality but item (A) is a roosting platform board 18 inches off the floor, wide enough to prevent roosting chickens from soiling your nest boxes with their droppings. (B) is a roosting perch 4 to 6 inches above the board platform. Allow at least 9 inches of roost perch space for each chicken in your flock and (C) is 1 or more nest boxes located underneath the roost platform board.  Remember when constructing you nest boxes to build them so it will be easy for you to remove old nest box litter and refill with clean nesting litter materials such as saw shavings, straw or grass hay. Clean nest box litter will aid greatly in keeping your eggs from becoming soiled making egg cleaning much easier.

Chicken coop with attached wire covered outdoor run.

Chicken coop with attached wire covered outdoor run.

This is an example of a small simple chicken coop with an attached wire covered run to house your chickens as well as protect them from predators. Your yard, with or without fencing and your chicken flock size and available building materials will dictate what type of chicken coop best fits your needs. Happy stress free chickens will produce many eggs for many months for you and your family.

Think healthy food before you snack. Eat healthy.

Not from the USA. Please leave me comment about your home town and country.

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Why is common sense so uncommon?
Don’t be Shy. Leave me your Comment(s).

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17 responses to “Back Yard Chicken Coop – My first WordPress post – 6 years and counting

  1. great job! Congrats on the anniversary 🙂

    Like

  2. Congradulations on being in the early wave of blogging and staying on the wave — hey, did you ever expect a surfing symbol for your OK farm? Saturday, I noticed one of our hens (is that what a female duck is referred to?) has 8 newly hatched ducklings under-wing. A little late in the season, but 3 other hens are still sitting on clutches. By afternoon, one of the goats, thoughtless creatures they are, walked right atop the pile of chicks. Then there were 7. This supports my prior theory about the Murder in the Barnyard. On the other hand, our barn cats protect the ducklings. Nobel cats.
    Oscar

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am of the opinion, domestic ducks and geese have lost or at least have their breeding season clocks out of whack.
      Goats Mmmmm … my experience with goats is, if you’re smaller than a 500 pound bull, they pay no attention to your presents.

      Happy gardening

      Like

  3. Thanks for sharing this again. I reblogged it. Thanks again.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Congrats on six years!! Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Congratulations on 6yrs

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Congrats on 6 years!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Well done! Congrats! You must almost be a WordPress pioneer. I have followed you only for 1/3 of the 6 years – but it’s always interesting and even (dare I say it!) rather useful!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Congratulations!!! we appreciate your writing, ideas and inspiration!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Congrats on the 6 years. I haven’t been on WP that long, but I know I haven’t seen a post that was NOT helpful in the 3 years I’ve been around. Great Job!!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Great advice, as always!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Urban foxes are more common than rural around here. A month ago I was closing up for the night and saw the dog fox and vixen walk calmly down the middle of the road before peeling off, one into the students’ back garden, the other along the alleyway to the park. When we had chickens the fence bottoms had to be buried and a brick path laid to the very edge. Foxes easily climb 5 or 6 ft fences and walls!

    WT

    Liked by 1 person

    • Our intensive large scale wheat farms and sparse wooded areas provide little habitat for Fox. Sad grin … however we do have our share of coyotes and skunks a-plenty.
      I fully agree, chicken pen fences must be in or at least well secured to the ground. I have seen skunks scale my 5 foot tall fence. Good for me bad for them, I have a motion activated light to light up my pen it also activates a old style telephone bell to alert me of intruders. When this light comes on I’m out the door with shotgun in hand. Skunk, coyote or other predator is in severe danger of getting a face full on #2 goose shot.
      Happy Gardening

      Like

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