Pickling Vegetables – Not just For Cucumbers

pickled okra Reference PDF USDA – Preparing and Canning Fermented Foods and Pickled Vegetables
Nearing the end of the gardening season I often find I have a great deal of vegetables that need to be harvested and preserved for winters dinner table. Of course you may decide to freeze or can much your garden surplus but pickling vegetables is also a good choice and so easy to do.

Everyone knows about pickled cucumbers, but what about pickled asparagus, broccoli, okra, peppers, radishes, or zucchini? Or maybe fermenting and canning a few jars of cabbage(sauerkraut). Almost all vegetables and many fruits can be pickled using the same basic recipe and procedure.

Hint Pickling salt is highly recommended and can be found in most supermarkets. However fermented and non-fermented pickles may be safely made using either iodized or non-iodized table salt. Be aware that the non-caking materials added to table salts may make the brine cloudy. Flake salt varies in density and is not recommended for use in canning or fermenting vegetables.
Vinegar Hint White vinegar produces a very tart flavor. Use apple vinegar to produce less tart flavored pickled fruits and vegetables.

PICKLED ASPARAGUS
10 lbs asparagus
6 large garlic cloves
4-1/2 cups water
4-1/2 cups white distilled vinegar (5%)
6 small hot peppers (optional)
1/2 cup canning salt
3 tsp dill seed
Wash asparagus well, but gently, under running water. Cut stems from the bottom to leave spears with tips that fit into the canning jar, leaving a little more than 1/2-inch headspace. Peel and wash garlic cloves. Place a garlic clove at the bottom of each jar, and tightly pack asparagus into hot jars with the blunt ends down. In an 8-quart saucepot, combine water, vinegar, hot peppers (optional), salt and dill seed. Bring to a boil. Place one hot pepper (if used) in each jar over asparagus spears. Pour boiling hot pickling brine over spears, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed.
Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process in a boiling water bath for 10 to 15 minutes.

PICKLED DILL BEANS
4 lbs fresh tender green or yellow beans (5 to 6 inches long)
8 to 16 heads fresh dill
8 cloves garlic (optional)
1/2 cup canning or pickling salt
4 cups white vinegar (5%)
4 cups water
1 tsp hot red pepper flakes (optional)
8 pints
Wash and trim ends from beans and cut to 4-inch lengths. In each hot sterile pint jar, place 1 to 2 dill heads and, if desired, 1 clove of garlic. Place whole beans upright in jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Trim beans to ensure proper fit, if necessary.
Combine salt, vinegar, water, and pepper flakes (if desired). Bring to a boil. Add hot solution to beans, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed.
Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process.

PICKLED BEETS
7 lbs of 2- to 2-1/2-inch diameter beets
4 cups vinegar (5%)
1-1/2 tsp canning or pickling salt
2 cups sugar
2 cups water
2 cinnamon sticks
12 whole cloves
4 to 6 onions (2- to 2-1/2-inch diameter), if desired
8 pints
Trim off beet tops, leaving 1 inch of stem and roots to prevent bleeding of color.
Wash thoroughly. Sort for size. Cover similar sizes together with boiling water and cook until tender (about 25 to 30 minutes).
Caution Drain and discard liquid.
Cool beets. Trim off roots and stems and slip off skins. Slice into 1/4-inch slices. Peel and thinly slice onions. Combine vinegar, salt, sugar, and fresh water. Put spices in cheesecloth bag and add to vinegar mixture. Bring to a boil. Add beets and onions. Simmer 5 minutes. Remove spice bag. Fill hot jars with beets and onions, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Add hot vinegar solution, allowing 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process in boiling water bath 10-15 minutes.
Variation:
For pickled whole baby beets, follow above directions but use beets that are 1-to
1-1/2 inches in diameter. Pack whole; do not slice. Onions may be omitted.

PICKLED CARROTS
2-3/4 lbs peeled carrots (about 3-1/2 lbs as purchased)
5-1/2 cups white vinegar (5%)
1 cup water
2 cups sugar
2 tsp canning salt
8 tsp mustard seed
4 tsp celery seed
4 pints jars
Wash and peel carrots. Cut into rounds that are approximately 1/2 inch thick.
Combine vinegar, water, sugar and canning salt in an 8-quart Dutch oven or stockpot. Bring to a boil and boil 3 minutes. Add carrots and bring back to a boil. Then reduce heat to a simmer and heat until half-cooked (about 10 minutes). Meanwhile, place 2 teaspoons mustard seed and 1 teaspoon celery seed into each empty hot pint jar. Fill jars with hot carrots, leaving 1-inch headspace. Fill with hot pickling liquid, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Removeair bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process in boiling water bath 10-15 minutes.

PICKLED CAULIFLOWER OR BRUSSELS SPROUTS
12 cups of 1- to 2-inch cauliflower flowerets or small Brussels sprouts
4 cups white vinegar (5%)
2 cups sugar
2 cups thinly sliced onions
1 cup diced sweet red peppers
2 tbsp mustard seed
1 tbsp celery seed
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp hot red pepper flakes
9 half-pint jars
Wash cauliflower flowerets or Brussels sprouts (remove stems and blemished outer leaves) and boil in salt water (4 tsp canning salt per gallon of water) for 3 minutes for cauliflower and 4 minutes for Brussels sprouts. Drain and cool. Combine vinegar, sugar, onion, diced red pepper, and spices in large saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer 5 minutes.
Distribute onion and diced pepper among jars. Fill hot jars with pieces and pickling solution, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process in boiling water bath 10-15 minutes.

Hints on spices Feel free to experiment. Add spices you like. Things like red pepper flakes, celery seed, dill seed and so on. Use as much or as little as you like to each jar before packing and pouring hot vinegar to fill your canning/pickling jar.

Reference PDF USDA – Preparing and Canning
Fermented Foods and Pickled Vegetables

Not from the USA. Please leave me comment about your home town and country.

If you see or read something you like Please Share By Re-blogging, Twitter or Email To A Friend<a

Why is Common Sense so Uncommon?
Don’t be Shy. Leave me your Comment(s)

Advertisements

7 responses to “Pickling Vegetables – Not just For Cucumbers

  1. Pingback: Refrigerator Pickles – Quick And Easy | Town & Country Gardening

  2. Pingback: Pickling Vegetables – Not just For Cucumbers | threewishesforme

  3. Thanks for dropping by my blog! Despite my fairly poor gardening results this summer, I am now finding myself with quite a few banana peppers and cherry peppers. I think I may give pickling a shot this year since I love pickled cherry peppers, and there’s no way I’ll eat all of them fast enough otherwise. Love your blog – will definitely be checking it out regularly!
    -Jason

    Like

    • Re Jason Rice MD – Thank for taking time to visit my tiny humble blog
      Food processor, excess peppers, garlic clove, tomato’s and an onion. Makes for a perfect homemade salsa.

      Grin … add some green stuff as well if you like that sort of stuff!

      Happy gardening

      Like

  4. I made turnip kraut last year and it went over really well, everybody is waiting for more this year.

    Like

    • re dotsonw – thanks for taking time to visit my humble little blog.
      I think many people miss out on a lot of great tasting foods just because they haven’t seen it on a supermarket shelf and are afraid of having a failed experiment… Grin my chickens get all my failed experiments!
      I like spicy foods and I put a bit of hot red pepper flakes in almost everything I can or pickle.

      Happy Fall pickling

      Like

  5. Thanks for the reminder and quick recipes!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s