You Can, Can Tomato’s – It’s Easy

sun-dried-tomatoes-in-oil Preparing and Canning Tomatoes Select only disease free, vine-ripened, tomato’s for canning.

Acidification – to ensure safe acidity in whole, crushed, or juiced tomatoes, add two tablespoons of bottled lemon juice or 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid per quart of tomatoes.
For pints, use one tablespoon bottled lemon juice or 1/4 teaspoon citric acid. Acid can be added directly to the jars before filling with product.
Four tablespoons of a 5 percent acidity vinegar per quart may be used instead of lemon juice or citric acid.
You may want add a small amount sugar to offset acid taste.

An average of 21 pounds is needed for 7 quarts or about 13 pounds is needed for 9 pints. A bushel weighs 53 pounds and yields 15 to 21 quarts.

Wash tomatoes. Dip in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or until skins split. Dip in cold water. Slip off skins and remove cores. Leave whole or halve. Add bottled lemon juice, vinegar or citric acid to jars. {Optional} Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jars.

Raw pack Heat water, for packing tomatoes, to boiling. Fill hot jars with prepared raw tomatoes, leaving ½-inch headspace. Cover tomatoes in the jars with boiling water, leaving ½-inch headspace.

Hot pack Put prepared tomatoes in a large saucepan and add enough water to completely cover them. Boil tomatoes gently for 5 minutes. Fill hot jars with hot tomatoes leaving ½-inch headspace. Add cooking liquid to the jars to cover the tomatoes, leaving ½-inch headspace.

Table 1. Recommended
process time for water-packed Whole or Halved Tomatoes
in a boiling-water canner.
  Process Time at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size 0 – 1,000 ft 1,001 – 3,000 ft 3,001 – 6,000 ft Above 6,000 ft
Hot &
Raw
Pints 40 min 45 50 55
Quarts 45 50 55 60
Table 2. Recommended
process time for water-packed Whole or Halved Tomatoes
in a dial-gauge pressure canner
  Canner Gauge Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of
Style of Pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 2,000 ft 2,001 – 4,000 ft 4,001 – 6,000 ft 6,001 – 8,000 ft
Hot &
Raw
Pints or Quarts 15 min 6 lb 7 lb 8 lb 9 lb
10 11 12 13 14
Table 3. Recommended
process time for water-packed Whole or Halved Tomatoes
in a weighted-gauge pressure canner.
  Canner Gauge Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes
Style of Pack Jar Size Process Time 0 – 1,000 ft Above 1,000 ft
Hot &
Raw
Pints or
Quarts
15 min 5 lb 10 lb
10 10 15

canning tomatos Hint Add a bit of spice to your life. Before packing jars with tomato’s, add a spoon full of finely chopped onion, garlic oregano, basel, pepper (hot or mild chili peppers) or other spices you like.

It really is just that easy.

Freezing Tomato’s is even faster and easy to do.
Wash tomato’s. Dry and pack in freezer bags. Hint After thawing frozen tomato’s the skin will slip off.

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5 responses to “You Can, Can Tomato’s – It’s Easy

  1. Thanks. Our tomatoes are about to take over the garden and I have been intimidated About preserving them.

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    • Re Kitty Cunningham – Thanks for taking time to visit my humble little blog
      Keep in mind that I am an older single male. But I find freezing tomato’s to be the easiest and fastest way to handle a lot of surplus tomato’s. When thawed they are easy to peel and then can be used in any recipe.
      Canning has the advantage that you will not loose your stored tomato’s in the event of a prolonged power outage.
      Grin … Happy gardening

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      • A friend suggested that I just go ahead and make a massive batch of Rasam (Indian tomato soup), but then I wouldn’t have any tomatoes for pasta sauce.

        I may try both methods this time around to see which I like better. I have only had one power outage in the 9 years I’ve lived here and it was <8 hours. My freezer managed to handle it.

        In a jar sounds like faster access when I have neglected to plan dinner. Frozen sounds like easier to gt finished in the heat. Both sound like decent choices.

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  2. nice charts Po. I’ll be sure to bookmark this one, now that I don’t have to worry about those pesky chickens 😉

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  3. Good information! We used to can over a hundred quarts of tomatoes every Summer when I was a kid. It was good, cheap food for a big farm family!

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