The Spice Of Life – Better Than Sex (Well Almost) Growing Peppers

Click picture to Zoom-In
Source of Pepper picture is unknown.,
sexy hot pepper Peppers like it hot. Pepper seeds germinate at soil temperatures of 75° – 90° F with 85° F being the ideal soil temperature.

The first thing you must decide is do you want to grow Sweet Mild peppers or Hot pepper types. Then you must select the pepper that is ‘Not’ to hot for your taste.

Jalapeno, Serrano, Cayenne or Tabasco type peppers are hot enough for most peoples taste. However they are down right mild when compared with some of the Habanero or Naga Jolokia peppers.

Below is a pepper chart indicating how hot different varieties of pepper will be at maturity.

Scoville Units

Chile Pepper

Heat
Range
Sweet Bell 0
Sweet Banana 0
Pimento 0
Cherry 00 ~ 500
Pepperoncini 100 ~ 500
Sonora 300 ~ 600
El-Paso 500 ~ 700
Santa Fe Grande 500 ~ 750
NuMex R Naky 500 ~ 1,000
Coronado 700 ~ 1,000
TAM Mild Jalapeno 1,000 ~ 1,500
New Mexico 6-4 1,000 ~ 1,500
Espanola 1,000 ~ 2,000
Poblano 1,000 ~ 2,000
Ancho 1,000 ~ 2,000
Mulato 1,000 ~ 2,000
Pasilla 1,000 ~ 2,000
Anaheim 500 ~ 2,500
Sandia 500 ~ 2,500
NuMex Big Jim 1,500 ~ 2,500
Rocotillo 1,500 ~ 2,500
Pulla 700 ~ 3,000
NuMex Joe E. Parker 1,500 ~ 3,000
Bulgarian Carrot 2,000 ~ 5,000
Mirasol 2,500 ~ 5,000
Guajillo 2,500 ~ 5,000
Jalapeno 2,500 ~ 8,000
Chipolte 5,000 ~ 8,000
Long Thick Cayenne 6,000 ~ 8,500
Hot Wax 5,000 ~ 9,000
Puya 5,000 ~ 10,000
Hidalgo 6,000 ~ 17,000
Aji Escabeche 12,000 ~ 17,000
Serrano 8,000 ~ 22,000
Manzano 12,000 ~ 30,000
Shipkas 12,000 ~ 30,000
NuMex Barker’s Hot 15,000 ~ 30,000
De Arbol 15,000 ~ 30,000
Jaloro 30,000 ~ 50,000
Aji 30,000 ~ 50,000
Tabasco 30,000 ~ 50,000
Cayenne 30,000 ~ 50,000
Santaka 40,000 ~ 50,000
Super Chile 40,000 ~ 50,000
Piquin 40,000 ~ 58,000
NuMex XX Hot 60,000 ~ 70,000
Yatsafusa 50,000 ~ 75,000
Red Amazon 55,000 ~ 75,000
Haimen 70,000 ~ 80,000
Chiltecpin 60,000 ~ 85,000
Thai 50,000 ~ 100,000
Merah 85,000 ~ 100,000
Tabiche 85,000 ~ 115,000
Bahamian 95,000 ~ 110,000
Carolina Cayenne 100,000 ~ 125,000
Kumataka 125,000 ~ 150,000
Bahamian 125,000 ~ 300,000
Jamaican Hot 100,000 ~ 200,000
Birds Eye 100,000 ~ 225,000
Tepin (Wild) 100,000 ~ 265,000
Datil 1,000 ~ 300,000
Devil Toung 125,000 ~ 325,000
Fatalii 125,000 ~ 325,000
Orange Habanero 150,000 ~ 325,000
Scotch Bonnet 150,000 ~ 325,000
TigrePaw-NR 265,000 ~ 348,000
Rocoto / Manzano 225,000 ~ 350,000
Caribbean Red 120,000 ~ 400,000
Choclate Habanero 325,000 ~ 425,000
Red Savina Habanero 350,000 ~ 575,000
Dorset Naga 800,000 ~ 900,000
Naga Jolokia “Ghost Pepper” 800,000 ~ 1,041,000
Pure Capsaicin 15-16,000,000

FAQ From Pepper Growers and Want To Be Pepper Growers

If you see or read something you like Please Share By Emailing It To A Friend.

Not from the USA. Please leave me comment about your home town and country.

Why is common sense so uncommon?
Don’t be Shy. Leave me your Comment(s)

Advertisements

8 responses to “The Spice Of Life – Better Than Sex (Well Almost) Growing Peppers

  1. Goodness, I had no idea there were so many types of peppers. It’s just too cold to grow in the UK unless you have a heated greenhouse (which unfortunatley we don’t have)

    Like

  2. I’m growing tam jalapeños, orange bell peppers, green bell peppers, and habaneros. Last year, I accidentally grew naga jolokia because the plant was mixed in with the jalapeños! I gave the few peppers it grew to a hot pepper aficionado and a chef. Both were thrilled.

    Like

  3. Love the rude pepper pics!!!

    Like

  4. We learned some years ago, in our region which can remain cool some Springs, that you should not put out pepper plants before the temperature is consistently about 45F. That can be tricky when we have snow one weekend and 85F for a week later. Frost may not return, but a cool spell can stunt the growth of pepper plants, which never really take off, even when the temperatures go up.

    Another tip we learned was to plant your hot and sweet peppers in different regions of the garden. Apparently the degree of heat depends on both the female flower and the source of pollen. One year we had hot and sweet mixed together. Regardless of which plant we harvested from, the flavor changed from pepper to pepper. That makes for tricky cooking (and eating)!
    Oscar

    Like

  5. this is so helpful. i was eating the spicy wings the other day and was wondering what’s the name of chilli’s unit count – Scoville! Interesting peppers you’ve got here 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s