Organic Produce And Meat Isn’t Better For You – Kellogg Lies About Blueberries In Their Products

Source: Organic produce and meat typically isn’t any better for you than conventional varieties
Based on Nutrition Alone, Organic produce and meat typically isn’t any better for you than conventional varieties when it comes to vitamin and nutrient content, according to a new review of the evidence.

Organic options may live up to their billing of lowering exposure to pesticide residue and antibiotic resistant bacteria. Crystal Smith-Spangler, said “patients ask are there health reasons to choose organic food in terms of nutritional content or human health outcomes? To answer that question, she and her colleagues reviewed over 200 studies that compared either the health of people who ate organic or conventional foods or, more commonly, nutrient and contaminant levels in the foods themselves.

Smith-Spangler and her colleagues found there was no difference in the amount of vitamins in plant or animal products produced organically and conventionally and the only nutrient difference was slightly more phosphorus in the organic products. Smith-Spangler said “it was uncommon for either organic or conventional foods to exceed the allowable limits for pesticides, so it’s unclear whether a difference in residues would have an effect on health.

Chensheng Lu, who studies environmental health and exposure at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, said that while the jury is still out on those effects, people should consider pesticide exposure in their grocery-shopping decisions. Lu said “If I was a smart consumer, I would choose food that has no pesticides, I think that’s the best way to protect your health.”

Kellogg Blueberry Muffin Cereal Contains No Blueberries! Even though Kellogg pictures blueberries on the cereal box.
Ingredients: Whole grain wheat, sugar, contains 2% or less of milled corn, brown rice syrup, corn syrup, natural and artificial flavor, modified corn starch, gelatin, soybean oil, glycerin, sorbitol, blue 2 lake, red 40 lake, red 40, BHT for freshness.

Kellogg Special K Cereal is another Kellogg product who’s advertisements are filled with misleading statements and down right lies. Blueberries are pictured on the box, yet contains No blueberries!
Special K® Blueberry Cereal is filled with rice, whole wheat flakes and sprinkled with blueberry flavored oat clusters.

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10 responses to “Organic Produce And Meat Isn’t Better For You – Kellogg Lies About Blueberries In Their Products

  1. When I heard the “head lines” about these studies, I thought “another hype message missing the point”. Personal and environmental health are a lot more complicated than chemical compositions of what most people consider food. I’ll take my blueberries off of my bushes, not out of a box (if they are even in there), and I will add composted manure and leaves rather than pesticides and fertilzers on them for their health.
    Oscar

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    • Re: hermitsdoor – Grin, Berries of any kind is not really an option for us here in SW Oklahoma. Our normal growing season, alkaline based soil, hot, dry winds and low humidity is just more than almost any berry plant can handle. Happy pesticide free Gardening

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  2. Re nutrition, fresh however it is grown must be better than anything but if pesticides kill insects what can they be doing to us?

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  3. Great post. I for one do not trust the “allowable” limits the “experts” give for exposure to pesticides. Seems like a no brainer to me ~ Hmmm… pesticides in my food, or no pesticides in my food? None for me, thanks. And the Kellogg’s misleading consumers doesn’t surprise me one bit.

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    • Re: Jewels – Grin… now it makes me want to know just how they make ‘blueberry flavored oat clusters’
      Happy Fall Fall Gardening

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  4. Very misleading about the blueberries! As always, we should read the fine print.

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