Bugs Bugging You? Herbs To The Rescue!

My iGarden website

FYI: It’s 2.22am and the wind is rolling a garbage can around outside, awaking me and my 2 trusty guard dogs. It’s 78%F, wind is holding steady at 25 gusting to 37mph. Whats a guy to do? I’m wide awake, it’s to early to be up and to late to go back to bed! I guess I better go catch that garbage can and tie it to a fence post or it will soon be in Kansas.

guard dogs

Caution: Guard Dogs On Duty

Here’s a little know tid bit of folk lore. Cucumber Magic: If grubs and slugs are ruining your planting beds? Place a few slices of cucumber in a small aluminum pie pan, place it in your garden and soon your garden will be free of pests all season long. The chemicals in the cucumber react with the aluminum to give off a scent undetectable to humans but drive garden pests crazy and make them flee the area. {Disclaimer: I don’t know if this really works, but, it’s worth a try.}

Sue Shekutat said herbs can help control insects and keep your patio or garden area free of pests! {Another worthwhile experiment you can try in your garden. Worst thing that can happen is you will have a lot on nice herbs to be harvested for use in your kitchen.}
whats bugging me
Judy Barrett said “most insect pests don’t like to eat or smell herbs.

Dalmatian Pyrethrum Chrysan-themum cinerarifolium. This variety of chrysanthemum is the source for many natural insecticides for flying and crawling insects. It is one of the least harmful to mammals or birds, but the dried flowers of the pyrethrum daisy will kill or stun the insects the moment it touches them. It is one of the safest pesticides to use on pests and their bedding to keep fleas and ticks away. The powder is the result of drying and crushing the flowers.

English Pennyroyal Mentha pulegium. A small-leaved herb that has spikes of lavender flowers, pennyroyal is a member of the mint family. Ground pennyroyal is one of the most effective tick deterrents available. Dust powder made from the leaves around areas where the pet sleeps and plays.

Feverfew Chrysanthemum parth-enium. Feverfew blooms midsummer through fall. The flower heads are used to make a pesticide to kill many pest insects.

Lavender Lavandula angustifolia. All of us know lavender as a beautiful aromatic herb that is used to scent food, soaps, cosmetics and many other products. If you dry bunches of lavender and hang them in the closet, they will repel moths and make your clothes smell good at the same time.

Lemon Basil Ocimum basilcum v. citriodorum. An aromatic herb with small pretty flowers and lemony fragrance, lemon basil is a fine culinary herb. When planted in the garden close to tomatoes, it deters white flies.

Mugwort Artemisia vulgaris. Mugwort leaves are used to repel moths. They can be made into sachets or dried and hung in the top of the closet.

Peppermint Mentha piperita. Peppermint helps repel ants, aphids, cabbage lopers, flea beetles, cabbage worms, squash bugs and white flies. Plant it near susceptible plants or make a tea from the crushed leaves and spray it on infested plants.

Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis. Rosemary leaves dried and powdered are used as a flea and tick repellent. Dust the powder around where your pet sleeps.

Sage Salvia officinalis. Sage is helpful planted next to cabbage to improve the taste and repel cabbage worms and moths.

Tansy Tanacetum vulgare. Leaves are used to repel ants and moths in sachets or when strewn around. The small yellow flowers are used in potpourri.

Wormwood Artemisia absinithium. Grows tall with gray silky foliage and spikes of small flowers. Powdered dust made from the leaves and sprinkled on plants and soil will deter many insects. It is not toxic; the bugs just don’t like the fragrance.

Tansy, rue and anise are good at repelling aphids, a perennial garden pest. Chamomile and hyssop will help discourage cabbage moths on your cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli. Basil and dill planted near your tomato plants will help keep tomato hornworms away. Dill and fennel are also good food plants for butterflies, particularly the swallowtail. They lure the caterpillars from other plants.

Beetles and squash bugs on your squash and cucumbers, plant mint, oregano or tansy nearby. Catnip and savory will discourage flea beetles and bean beetles on your bean plants, parsley and rosemary will keep carrot flies away from your carrots.

You can used dried herbs to make fragrant potpourri or sachets that will repel insects in the closet or storage chests. Mint, rosemary, rue, tansy, thyme, wormwood, southernwood, lavender, pennyroyal and lemon geranium are all excellent at repelling moths that get into your winter clothes. Put the dried herbs in a cloth bag {cheese cloth} that is loosely woven enough to let the air circulate and let it hang from a hanger in the closet or tuck it into a drawer or chest for the summer. When it comes time to get out your winter clothes, they’ll smell good and be moth-free.

My iGarden website

7 responses to “Bugs Bugging You? Herbs To The Rescue!

  1. Pingback: Southernwood | Find Me A Cure

  2. Pingback: What’s Bugging Your Garden? | Town & Country Gardening

  3. Pingback: What’s Bugging Your Garden? | Town & Country Gardening

  4. Pingback: Lemon Basil | Landscaping - Gardening

  5. Pingback: Practical And Simple Ways To Implement Normal House Pest Control | Green Grow Box

  6. Pingback: Tip: Mosquitos – repel them with plants! « Garden With Cindy

  7. I’ve taken some of my sage plants out of pots and replanted them amongst my cabbage plants as your article suggested. I’ll let you know if it worked at the end of the season.

    I may have a garden yet … blessed with another two days of sunshine … but still unseasonably cool … hope yours continues to recover … S.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s